Filebox As Playlist [...]

The Filebox in Xerox’s NoteCards system was similar to the “playlists” of today. It would be an interesting exercise to print out each of the wikity cards onto real paper cards, and flip through them like a card catalog.

In addition to the standard text and graphic cards, NoteCards has more card types built in. These are filebox and browser cards. They support the user in sorting and categorizing the content cards. A filebox is a simple way to collect cards that have some aspects in common. Fig. 2.6 shows two filebox cards in the lower left corner. Fileboxes can also contain other filebox cards and provide to such an extent a hierarchical structure among the cards. A browser card shows a diagram based on the link structure between the cards. The large window in Fig. 2.6 is an example for this. (Source)

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Love Bench [...]

The Love Bench pulls people together.

Last month, the East Japan Railway Company (JR East) installed a single pair of heart-shaped hand straps on one of its lines in hopes of sparking romance among their passengers. However, with Valentine’s Day behind us it seems they aren’t through playing matchmaker.

This time JR Shikoku is strapping on some cupid wings by installing ”Love Love Benches” in two of their stations. The seat of the bench slopes inwards so that no matter how two people sit on it they will quickly be brought together thanks the marvel of gravity.

Two downward planes gather people together. Are there other examples of where downward planes gather people? The main stairwells at the Art Institute of Chicago merge together onto one platform.

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The Writer’s Bench [...]

A great notion of being able to sit on a public bench and watch various art galleries pass by.

Throughout the history of the New York City subway’s aerosol art movement there were meeting places for writers known as writer’s corners or writer’s benches. The majority of these meeting places were in the subway system.

The last active location was the 149th Street Grand Concourse subway station in The Bronx, on the 2 and 5 IRT lines. It was active from the 1970s until the decline of subway painting in the late 1980s.

Writers from all over the city congregated at a bench located at the back of the uptown platform. They came to meet, make plans, sign black books and settle disputes. The main activity was watching art on the passing trains (known as benching). The writers would admire and criticize the latest paintings.
This station was an ideal location for a writer’s bench for several reasons. It was a station where the 2 and 5 lines converged. The 2 and 5 lines featured some of the most artistic works in the city. The fact that many lay-ups and train yards for the 2s and 5s were located in both the Bronx and Brooklyn made creativity on these lines extremely competitive. An overpass connecting the uptown and downtown platforms was an ideal vantage point from which to view the passing trains.

Since paintings rarely if ever run on trains today, this bench is no longer frequented by writers. Old school New York writers occasionally visit the site for the sake of nostalgia. Writers post 1989 and writers from outside New York City occasionally visit it as a historical location. (Source)

Found Glitch Art [...]

A board with glitches found in London
A board with glitches found in London

People sharing their discoveries of accidental glitches found in public spaces. Glitch Safari collects photos of glitches from the real world. (flickr) (vimeo) The act of discovery and sharing transforms the mundane mistakes into artwork.

Related public discoveries: Bad English usage discovered worldwide, shared on Engrish.com

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Typewriter Art [...]

Typewriter art predates ASCII Art, and anticipates many of its techniques. See Basics of ASCII Art.

October 1898 typewriter art, by Flora Stacy in Phonetic Journal. (source)
October 1898 typewriter art, by Flora Stacy in Phonetic Journal. (source)

Flora Stacy is the first well-known typewriter artist, although people were playing with the possibilities of typewriter art from the invention of the very first typewriter. Stacy’s picture of a butterfly, typed on an early typewriter, appeared in the Phonetic Journal in 1898.

Interestingly, typewriters allow more granular positioning of the typed elements than most electronic means, allowing for the creation of more organic looking compositions. Also, on older manual typewriters the darkness of the letter can be adjusted through the force with which the key is hit.

Works such as the Portrait of Nicole Kidman by Keira Rathbone make use of this ability to position, overtype, and vary darkness. (html)

Portrait of Nicole Kidman, by Keira Rathbone (source)
Portrait of Nicole Kidman, by Keira Rathbone (source)

Paul Smith, a man with cerebral palsy, is famous for his typewriter art. To see his technique, try Paul Smith’s Typewriter Art.

Typewriter artists even did things close to emojis. See Typewriter Emojis.

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Art -isms [...]

Art movements are the core of most art history courses and play a role in many appreciation curricula as well. This video by Nicole Caulfield (an art teacher) and her daughter Lizzy introduces grade school and middle school students to the idea of art movements.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z9Fy9GTXRRchttp://

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Basics of ASCII Art [...]

ASCII art is a form of art which uses characters as its basic unit of construction. It is an extension of Typewriter Art, which appeared shortly after the invention of the typewriter.

ASCII art generators take text and create ASCII art algorithmically. (html)

In the 1970s and 80s, large banners were often produced as ASCII art.

ASCII art remains a staple of certain online cultures, such as some Twitter communities. Shruggie and Sign Bunny are two common examples of ASCII art found on Twitter.

The subreddit r/ASCII collects examples of ASCII art.

Modern ASCII art may contain Unicode Characters far beyond the 128 characters in standard ASCII.

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