Messaging Patterns Overview [...]

This pattern catalog describes 65 integration patterns, collected from many integration projects since 2002. The patterns provide technology-independent design guidance for developers and architects to describe and develop robust integration solutions. The inspiration to document these patterns came when we struggled through multiple integration vendors’ product documentation just to realize later that many of the underlying concepts were quite similar.

Why Enterprise Integration Patterns?

Enterprise integration is too complex to be solved with a simple ‘cookbook’ approach. Instead, patterns can provide guidance by documenting the kind of experience that usually lives only in architects’ heads: they are accepted solutions to recurring problems within a given context. Patterns are abstract enough to apply to most integration technologies, but specific enough to provide hands-on guidance to designers and architects. Patterns also provide a vocabulary for developers to efficiently describe their solution.

Patterns are not ‘invented’; they are harvested from repeated use in practice. If you have built integration solutions, it is likely that you have used some of these patterns, maybe in slight variations and maybe calling them by a different name. The purpose of this site is not to “invent” new approaches, but to present a coherent collection of relevant and proven patterns, which in total form an integration pattern language.

(Source)

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The Recurse Center [...]

Join the best programming community in the world

The Recurse Center is a free, self-directed, educational retreat for people who want to get better at programming, whether they’ve been coding for three decades or three months.

The Recurse Center is…

Self-directed

We value intrinsic motivation and self-direction, and believe people learn best when they're free to explore their passions and interests.
Accessible

We're free for everyone. We also offer need-based grants for living expenses for people from traditionally underrepresented groups in programming.
Stimulating

We look for smart, friendly, self-directed, and intellectually curious people who enjoy programming and want to get dramatically better.
Exceptional

We have exceptional residents including Peter Norvig, Jessica McKellar, Yaron Minsky, Leigh Honeywell, David Nolen, Peter Seibel, Nada Amin, and more.
Thoughtful

The atmosphere here is friendly and intellectual. We have a gender-balanced environment, and lightweight social rules.
Supportive

We have a tight-knit community of more than 700 alumni from over 30 countries. Our motto is "never graduate."
Project-based

Recursers have made significant contributions to dozens of open source projects and started many of their own.
Connected

We make money by helping great companies hire our alumni. There's no obligation to take a job if you don't want one.

The Recurse Center NY

https://www.recurse.com/

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Code Fellows [...]

Code 401: Advanced Software Development
Advance Your Career
code-fellows-student

Code 401 courses are the most intense courses offered at Code Fellows. Students come in with various backgrounds and leave with the training and skills they need to excel as professional software developers. Code 401 courses require prior experience in software development, whether through preceding Code Fellows courses, self-study, or on-the-job training.
Code 401
javascript
Advanced Software Development in Full-Stack JavaScript

Students will learn to build full-stack applications. The first four weeks focus on building back-end web applications with Node.js. During weeks five through eight, students learn to build web apps with modern front-end libraries and frameworks. This course goes in depth into the core competencies of JavaScript, object-oriented programming, and functional programming. Students get hands-on practice in test-driven development with agile tools and best practices. Learn More »
ios
Advanced Software Development in iOS

Students will learn how to create mobile apps in Objective-C and Swift, Apple’s new programming language, and use industry tools and frameworks such as Cocoa, Xcode, UIKit, Git, and more. Specifically, students will dive deep into UIKit, asynchronous code, CoreImage, NSURLSession and JSON, MapKit and CoreLocation, AutoLayout, Source Control, Core Data, Animation, and the app submission process. Learn More »
python
Advanced Software Development in Python

Students will learn to write clean, well-tested, advanced Python code using industry-standard software engineering patterns. They will study the foundational structures of networked programming, from sockets and protocols to advanced frameworks such as Django, Flask, and Pyramid. Learn More »
Class Format

While every day is a little different, students can expect consistency. Half of the day, Monday through Thursday, students are in class learning to code through lectures, in-class assignments, and live coding sessions. The other half of the day (or more) is spent in lab time,

getting specialized attention from instructors and TAs and honing development skills—all preparation to land a high-paying job as a software developer. Fridays are dedicated to project presentations and our Professional Development Curriculum, which prepares students for their job search.
What Can Code 401 Graduates Do?

Code 401 courses are designed for the developer who needs to put the finishing touch on their skill set, get real-world experience, or learn another programming language. To find out more about the success of our graduates, read our Student Success page.


Cris Ewing

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Cris Ewing — trainer [...]

Training
I offer training in the Plone Content Management System for content creators, editors and managers, developers, and systems administrators.

You’ve made the choice to use Plone as your CMS. That’s a great choice and I congratulate you, picking the right tool for the job is the first battle and you’ve won it. But there’s still the rest of the war. You need some help getting you and the rest of your team up to speed. Your content creators, editors and managers need to learn how to use the new tool. Your developers need to learn how to customize the system to best fit your needs, and your systems administrators need to learn how to make Plone the blazingly fast, utterly reliable and completely secure system it can become.


http://www.crisewing.com/edu

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about (ˢᵒᶜⁱᵉᵗʸserver) [...]

(ˢᵒᶜⁱᵉᵗʸserver) is a platform for the collaborative building of websites.

(ˢᵒᶜⁱᵉᵗʸserver) is not a webserver but also integrates with a number of other protocols. it features integration with communication services like email, chat and supports a programming API for rich client development.

You can use (ˢᵒᶜⁱᵉᵗʸserver) to build your own sites or ask us to build them for you.

(ˢᵒᶜⁱᵉᵗʸserver) is built with ᵒᵖᵉⁿsTeam(pdf), a project by the University of Paderborn in Germany, lead by Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Thorsten Hampel. (Obituary)

Our current focus is the development of an email-task-manager.


from: http://societyserver.org/about/

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Why Discourse is a great example for demonstrating the value of GraphQL over a REST API, [...]

REST consists of many URL endpoints, where inputs are passed through URL segments, query parameters, and headers. The result is a JSON blob with arbitrary structure.
GraphQL has many available root queries, which form the entry point into an object graph. The graph schema consists of types, fields, and relationships between them. The result of a request always matches the shape of the query you passed in.


https://medium.com/apollo-stack/discourse-in-graphql-part-1-ee1ffd8a22df

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