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How Wikity Works [...]

Much of software development is _open_, meaning that anybody is allowed to take code that someone else has written and modify it for their own purposes. This is similar to the idea of open content in education: open textbooks, open educational resources, open pedagogy. When someone performs a modification of this type we celebrate it as a success, and call it a "fork...

 

Abacus school [...]

> Abacus or abaco refers to calculations, especially the subject of direct calculations, using Hindu numerals without the help of the abacus (an instrument for calculating).[1] Abacus school is a term applied to any Italian school or tutorial after the 13th century, whose commerce-directed curriculum placed special emphasis on mathematics, such as algebra, among other...

 

The Manner and Form (1553) [...]

> The maner and fourme (1553) > [7] The starting point for this reading of Peele’s books is the impressive title page of  The maner and fourme (see figure 1, below). The rebus of its printer, Richard Grafton, appears prominently at the bottom of the page, depicting a ‘tun’ or barrel, from which issues a grafted tree, probably the tree of knowledge, the whole b...

 

Funding Pressures [...]

> Debbie Sills, national managing director of public sector practice at Deloitte Consulting, said US states have “primarily” cut funding to public higher education because they have “funding pressures”, not because their “philosophical belief” in the value of universities has changed. > She said that healthcare is taking an “enormous part of their budget...

 

Obama Effect (Education) [...]

> While access might be a part of that, without a narrative shift access is meaningless. We have examples such as the Obama effect, where it is speculated that black students closed the achievement gap on standardized test because of the positive reinforcement that came from all directions in culture during the campaign of Barack Obama. The blip in the test scores did...

 

Rush City Transformed [...]

> Richard Neutra's Rush City Transformed, from 1928. Ninety percent Non-Space, combined with some sterile megabuildings. You don't even have to build it to know that the result is going to be 90% suckitude, and the remaining 10% mega-sterile. It's inevitable. > > - An additional issue here is [[Defensible Space]]...

 

Libraries as unique, charged spaces [...]

"Bibliotheksflirt," a book by Jonas Fansa (2008), uses qualitative interviews of academic library patrons to show that patrons gravitate toward library spaces in their own right, not just to use the resources contained therein. Patrons mentioned the unique quality of the "library concentration" which they achieve when working there, the attraction of browsing, seei...

 

How the MLIS roles in Germany are evolving [...]

2014 review of where MLIS graduates fit into the German library prsystem. http://b-u-b.de/mit-master-in-bibliothek/...

 

Green Space Not Sustainable [...]

> I don't think many people realize how much this poisonous Green Space concept has infected our ideas of how to build cities. For example: > > > Clackamas County, Oregon. > > Title 12: Zoning and Development Ordinance. > > Section 1000: Development Standards. > > > > 1009 Landscaping, 1009.02 Minimum Area Standard > > > > The minimum area requirements may include ...

 

Garden City Movement [...]

> The garden city movement is a method of urban planning that was initiated in 1898 by Sir Ebenezer Howard in the United Kingdom. Garden cities were intended to be planned, self-contained communities surrounded by "greenbelts", containing proportionate areas of residences, industry, and agriculture. > > Inspired by the utopian novel Looking Backward and Henry George'...

 

There’s No There There [...]

> "There's no there there," said Gertrude Stein famously about Oakland, California. She was speaking on a vague, aesthetic level, but it is also true on a physical, square-feet kind of level too. I say that there are two kinds of sqare-footage in a city: Places and Non-Places. > > Places are areas where things happen. This includes: > > Houses > Offices > Factories ...

 

Help:: Getting Started / Day One [...]

Most people find that using Wikity to bookmark is a good place to start. The following video shows how you can bookmark with Wikity. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66IGbiATzsY Note that in the video the bookmark says 'Bkmrk' but in recent versions says 'Wik-it'. The editor has also been upgraded...

 

Goutte – Web Scraping Library [...]

> Goutte – Web Scraping Library > > Goutte is a library for scraping websites and extracting data. It provides a nice API that makes it easy to select specific elements from the remote pages....

 

Palantir Discrimination [...]

Palantir accused of racism. >Privately held Palantir helps government agencies track down terrorists and uncover financial fraud. It raised $880 million in funding late last year, for a $20 billion valuation, and is considered one of Silicon Valley's most secretive companies. > Palantir was co-founded by Peter Thiel and Joe Lonsdale, two of Silicon Valley's more infl...

 

Air Loom [...]

> Matthews believed that a gang of criminals and spies skilled in pneumatic chemistry had taken up residence at London Wall in Moorfields (close to Bethlem) and were tormenting him by means of rays emitted by a machine called the "Air Loom". The torments induced by the rays included "Lobster-cracking", during which the circulation of the blood was prevented by a magne...

 

A Mirror of Chavez [...]

Cosmopolitan talks to Machado and gets the comparison that no one saw: > Trump’s sudden and unexpected rise as a political figure has jolted Machado into action. After the New York Times called her for a story that ran in May detailing dozens of women’s allegations of sexual harassment, she realized she needed to speak up more about her experience with him and wa...

 

Where Did You Find This? [...]

> You can easily see why Clinton’s campaign decided this was the perfect anecdote to display his grotesque personal qualities. It contains several elements all at once. There is Trump’s lecherous habit of creeping around beauty contestants, which is its own deep vein of gross behavior. There is the cruel reduction of women to their appearance. And there is the ant...

 

Watergate and Access [...]

> "Woodward and Bernstein of 1972-74 didn't have such access, and this probably influencedfor the bettertheir view of what Nixon and his men were capable of. Watergate wasn't broken by reporters who had entree to the inner corridors of power. It was two guys on the Metro Desk."...

 

Novelty Demands Novelty [...]

> I agree with the Atlantic’s James Fallows about Trump. “No one like him has gotten this close to the presidency in modern times.” Which is not to say he came out of nowhere, or that there is no precedent for his political style. A long series of developments left the presidential nominating system and the Republican party vulnerable to Trump. A long series of ...

 

Technical Debt of the 2016 Race [...]

> Josh thought this had happened with the Republican Party. For example, “a large portion of the GOP is not satisfied with what can realistically be achieved by conventional political means.” It should have found a way to put this to its most demanding supporters, but there was always a reason to avoid that massive reckoning. This left it vulnerable to a huckster ...

 

Asymmetric Polarization [...]

> Four years later, Dan Balz of the Washington Post, probably the most respected figure in the political press, admitted that Mann and Ornstein were onto something. “They were ahead of others in describing the underlying causes of polarization as asymmetrical,” he wrote. Why did it take four years? (In 2012 and 2014 Balz was noncommittal about the thesis.) Two ans...

 

Scoured Everything [...]

> A teacher living outside Chicago, she added that she had "scoured everything" about why vaccines might be harmful and had become "pretty convinced." She chose not to vaccinate based on the results of her research but had read only material that cast doubt. > > "I put my kids at risk," she said. "I wish that I had taken more time to research from both sides before m...

 

Digital Hustle [...]

> I found these workers relied on their smartphones — and sometimes free Wi-Fi at restaurants and libraries — as essential tools in their digital hustle. They used their phones to find and coordinate work and care, and to alleviate stress in emotionally draining jobs. For many, making ends meet means constantly checking and participating in online networks...

 

First Computer Generated Music [...]

> The machine, which filled much of the lab’s ground floor, was used to generate three melodies; God Save the King, Baa, Baa Black Sheep, and Glenn Miller’s swing classic In the Mood. > > But when UC professor Jack Copeland and composer Jason Long examined the 12-inch (30.5cm) acetate disc containing the music, they found the audio was distorted. > > “The freq...

 

Changes in Privilege Drive Racist Violence [...]

> In order to fully understand why ethnic violence happens, he argued, we need to appreciate the role of resentment: the feeling of injustice on the part of a privileged portion of society when it sees power slipping into the hands of a group that hadn't previously held it. Drawing on social psychology, he theorized that one of the underappreciated causes of ethnic vi...

 

Not Economic Anxiety [...]

> This anger plays some small part, but it doesn't tell most of the story. A vast universe of academic research suggests the real drivers are something very different: anger over immigration and a toxic mix of racial and religious intolerance. That conclusion is supported by an extraordinary amount of social science, from statistical analyses that examine data on how ...

 

Tim Slater [...]

> In January, Speier gave a speech on the floor of the US House of Representatives recounting the allegations against Timothy Slater, who taught astronomy at the University of Arizona and is now a professor at the University of Wyoming. Speier had obtained the results of a confidential 2005 investigation conducted by the University of Arizona. "Dr. Slater himself admi...

 

College Is Not Home [...]

> What feels like a “safe space” to one person can feel stifling or even “unsafe” to another. A sex-positive feminist may want to decorate her dorm door with a poster from a provocative art exhibition. An evangelical Christian across the hall might not feel “at home” seeing graphic images each morning upon leaving her dorm room. Yet forbid the feminist art...

 

A 53 Year Old Computer Runs Our Nuclear Defense [...]

> We did indeed find the oldest computer in government, but it’s not really a computer at all; it’s computer software. In some ways that’s satisfying: old software needs just as much maintenance, expertise, and money to keep it running the machines correctly. It’s also what’s most exploitable, even if exploits written against custom assembly are unlikely. An...

 

75% of Federal IT Is In O&M [...]

> In other words: follow the money. One of this report’s key findings was that of all the money the Federal Government spends on their information systems, about 75% of that is spent on operations and maintenance (O&M) alone, with “5,233 of the government’s approximately 7,000 IT investments […] spending all of their funds on O&M activities.” This means that...

 

Altman Twitter Break [...]

> Earlier this summer, Sam Altman, President of the Y Combinator Group, left citing community issues on the Twitter platform. He argued that the social network “rewards negativity and snark,” and that he felt “worse after using Twitter.” > > Unlike Altman, Andreessen didn’t leave a Tweetstorm explaining his exit, but it is possible that many of the same rea...

 

Ego Depletion Fails to Replicate [...]

> The 1998 study, led by Roy Baumestier from Case Western University, provided evidence for something called ego depletion, which is the idea that our willpower can be worn down over time. > > The latter assumption has been the basis of a huge amount of follow-on psychological studies, but now Martin Hagger from Curtin University in Australia has led researchers from...

 

Surveillance Capitalism [...]

> Over the past 30 years, shifts in our communication infrastructures have enabled large-scale attempts to reshape the very possibilities of social order in the interests of market functioning and commercial exploitation. > > Some see this as a new “surveillance capitalism”. This is focused on data extraction rather than the production of new goods, thus generati...

 

All Scientific Work is Incomplete [...]

> One of Ronald Fisher’s most important contributions to modern statistics is the concept of the “null hypothesis.” This is the philosophical starting point in any statistical test, the presumption that, in the absence of better evidence, you should not change your mind. When in doubt, assume that the fertilizer hasn’t worked, that the antibiotic has had no ef...

 

Fisher Eugenics [...]

> Throughout his life, Fisher was an unflinching reactionary. In 1911, while studying at Cambridge, he helped found the university’s Eugenics Society. Though many well-educated English men of the day embraced this ideology, Fisher took to the issue with an unusual fervency. Throughout his career, he intermittently wrote papers on the subject. A particular concern of...

 

Fisher’s Retirement [...]

Be careful of work done from retirement. > In some ways, the timing was perfect. In 1957, Fisher had just retired and was looking for a place to direct his considerable intellect and condescension. > > Neither the first nor the last retiree to start a flame war, Fisher launched his opening salvo by questioning the certainty with which the British Medical Journal had ...

 

Tarring the Roads [...]

> Hill and Doll tried to find that evidence in the hospitals of London. They tracked down over 1,400 patients, half of whom were suffering from lung cancer, the other half of whom had been hospitalized for other reasons. Then, as Doll later told the BBC, “we asked them every question we could think of.” > > These questions covered their medical and family histor...

 

Super ANOVA [...]

> After his falling out with the older Pearson, Fisher took a position at the Rothamsted Agricultural Experiment Station north of London in 1919. It was here that he helped introduce the concept of randomization as one of the most important tools in scientific experiments. > > Up until then, the research station had been studying the effectiveness of different fertil...

 

Analogies and Wittgenstein [...]

> The virtue of analogies for Wittgenstein consists in "changing our way of seeing." Experience is diffuse, fragmented, and isolated — modern experience increasingly so. A good analogy leaps across a wide terrain of experience to reveal connections between domains that we wouldn’t have thought had anything to do with one another. In so doing, the analogy produces ...

 

Obesity and Gut Bacteria [...]

> Dr Michelle Beaumont, lead study author from the department of twin research and genetic epidemiology at King's College London, said although the study showed a clear link, it was not yet possible to explain why it existed. > One theory is that a lack of variety in faecal bacteria could lead to the domination of high levels of gut microbes which are good at turning ...

 

StackOverflow and Newbies [...]

> I stopped contributing because it wasn’t that challenging anymore and there are too many similar, easy questions. > Stackoverflow is not declining, it is serving its purpose quite well. > Mods are not evil jerks that just hate you for not knowing something > Stackoverflow is a little more boring for contributors now than it was before (which is why I gradually sto...

 

Death of the Power Pose [...]

> The key takeaway, which she underlines and bolds for emphasis: “I do not believe that “power pose” effects are real.” But Carney goes into some really interesting detail about how she came to that conclusion. She notes that while some of her skepticism stems from the recent replication attempts, there were also decisions she, Cuddy, and Yap made as researche...

 

Free College and Attainment [...]

> This matters because the quality of a college matters more than the price of tuition for student success. Most low-income students already pay no net tuition to attend community college, yet only about a third graduate within six years. > More than half of the countries in the OECD offer free college. They have higher levels of enrollment than the United States but ...

 

Primacy Effect [...]

> Debate pros, much like courtroom lawyers, have a name for this: “the primacy effect.” It’s the idea that whatever is heard first is likely to be what is best remembered. > > “In debates and in trial work, there’s the doctrine of primacy,” said Judd Gregg, who played Gore in Bush’s mock debate preparations in 2000 and John Kerry in 2004. “If you do a...

 

When Doctors Don’t Look Past the Weight [...]

When doctors don't look past the weight, they become worse doctors. > Part of the problem, both patients and doctors say, is a reluctance to look beyond a fat person’s weight. Patty Nece, 58, of Alexandria, Va., went to an orthopedist because her hip was aching. She had lost nearly 70 pounds and, although she still had a way to go, was feeling good about herself. Un...

 

Doctors and Weight Stigma [...]

Doctors are prey to weight stigma, and cannot do their jobs effectively because of it. > When Anna Guest-Jelley—26 years old at the time—badly twisted her ankle, the Nashville native went to see her doctor. "Your ankle's probably swollen," she said, "because you're carrying extra weight." > Guest-Jelley, a yoga teacher, went along with her diagnosis. When the ...

 

Addiction Is a Form of Learning [...]

Addiction bears some similarities to learning. > According to Marc Lewis, a developmental neuroscientist at Radboud University, addiction is another form of learning. “It’s the brain taking the shortest route to get what it wants, repercussions be damned.” An addict turned academic, Lewis documented his experiences with psychotropics in his book Memoirs of an Ad...

 

Finger-mouthing Spread [...]

Finger mouthing is a photoblogging trend that has spread through fashion communities. Yet it is still the adoption of it by people like Kylie Jenner that spread it virally. > Some however dispute the ‘new trend’ label, with TeenVogue claiming it is too similar to the so-called ‘T-rex hands’ pose, in which you bend your fingers in a claw like position and plac...

 

Not Editors [...]

Facebook claims it's editorial algorithms are not really "editors" and thereby dodges responsibility for editing. > In an interview at Facebook’s sprawling headquarters here, which has a giant, self-driving golf cart that takes workers between buildings, Mr. Marra said he did not think too much about his impact on journalism. > > “We try to explicitly view ourse...

 

Listian Centralization [...]

> Friedrich List and his best-known American counterpart, Alexander Hamilton, argued that industrial development entailed a more sweeping sort of market failure. Societies did not automatically move from farming to small crafts to major industries just because millions of small merchants were making decisions for themselves. If every person put his money where the ret...

 

The Luddite Problem [...]

"Luddite" as insult. "Luddite" as ahistoricism. "Luddite," depoliticized. > There is widespread ignorance about science and technology. For example, we have people with computer chips in their head right now, and it improves their life. Many of us have elderly members with cochlear implants, but most people don’t understand that these are computers hooked up to peop...

 

Learning Is Not Fun [...]

Learning is not always fun, and maybe it shouldn't be. >Firstly, the premise is all wrong. Anybody who plays video games knows that they are not FUN. They are always engaging, but they are also often anxiety provoking, sometimes frustrating, occasionally anger-inducing. Secondly, the conclusion is absurd: learning is not, nor should it always be FUN. Learning is hard ...

 

Male Politicians Get to Be Complex [...]

Male politicians get to be flawed in a way that female politicians do not. > But that’s not the case for male politicians. In fact, it’s often their flaws that make them likable. After all, on paper the idea of an old disheveled man yelling sounds downright unpleasant. But in practice Bernie Sanders is an utterly charming and refreshing political figure. And whil...

 

Nutrition Industrial Complex [...]

The dietary guidelines of the past were as much politics as science. A journalist researched the topic, and published an article in the BMJ. The Nutrition Industrial Complex fought back with a vengeance, calling for retraction. > The congressional review has come about partly because of Nina Teicholz. Since her book was published, in 2014, Teicholz has become an advo...

 

Counterproductive Loser [...]

Weight loss is more complex than it looks. > All this does not mean that modest weight loss is hopeless, experts say. Individuals respond differently to diet manipulations — low-carbohydrate or low-calorie diets, for example — and to exercise and weight-loss drugs, among other interventions. > > But Dr. Ludwig said that simply cutting calories was not the answer....

 

Breaking the Union with the Mold [...]

> One poignant illustration can be found in the history of nineteenth century industrial mechanization. At Cyrus McCormick's reaper manufacturing plant in Chicago in the middle 1880s, pneumatic molding machines, a new and largely untested innovation, were added to the foundry at an estimated cost of $500,000. In the standard economic interpretation of such things, we ...

 

Literature Does Not Mean Liking [...]

> Always respecting the exceptions among them, one notes that too many of these consumer reviewers misunderstand the inmost nature of what literature means. It does not mean "liking." Novels are routinely denigrated when characters are not found to be likable. Is Raskolnikov likable? Is King Lear? The plethora of such naive readers testifies to a failure of imaginati...

 

Donald Trump’s First War [...]

There are people out there who think that a Trump presidency will be a sort of national colonic an unpleasant experience that will foster such backlash that that in four years we will get Real Change™. This, of course, is the "bust" in the "Bernie or Bust" proposition, and is likely the secret hope of a number of Republicans as well. And it's completely wrong. It's...

 

Origin of the UK Social Democratic Party [...]

> The origin of the party can be traced back to the ideological divisions in the Labour Party in the 1950s (with its forerunner being the Campaign for Democratic Socialism established to support the Gaitskellites), but publicly lies in the 1979 Dimbleby Lecture given by Roy Jenkins as he neared the end of his presidency of the European Commission. Jenkins argued the n...

 

How the Falklands Made Thatcher [...]

The Falklands War turned a faltering Prime Minister into an unstoppable force. > The nation drank deep of an experience it had not enjoyed since 1945: a clear military triumph. The victory dragged Thatcher's leadership from the brink of collapse. She won global celebrity, in both the United States and the Soviet Union, and 10 points were added to her poll rating. She...

 

The Crying Native American That Wasn’t [...]

The Native American we remember from the anti-littering PSAs of the 1970s wasn't actually Native American. > Espera Oscar de Corti was a Sicilian-American actor that took method acting to the next level. Forget about Marlon Brando, Heath Ledger, Daniel-Day Lewis and those guys, de Corti lived most of his life as a character. > > Who is this de Corti, you ask? > > Y...

 

Splitting Labour Led To Thatcher [...]

The creation of a third party (and a liberal exodus to it) preceded and may have contributed to Thatcher's victory. > While the electoral consequences of a party split are relatively minor under the proportional electoral systems used in much of Europe, Britain’s district plurality (or “first past the post”) electoral system punishes division heavily. In a winne...

 

The Youthful Cult of Corbyn [...]

A fascinating parallel to the Sanders phenomenon in America may be taking place in Britain, where a good deal of the youth vote seems under the spell of a 70-year-old socialist. Even the Twitter feeds seem the same. The interesting parallel here is the supposition that leadership is equivalent to demonstration of unwavering belief, and the delusion that there are e...

 

K12 Sexual Assault Guidelines [...]

> The White House offered new guidance this week aimed at getting K-12 schools to improve their treatment of students who are sexually assaulted, emphasizing training on dealing with trauma. It noted that girls of color face disproportionately high rates of class suspensions....

 

PrintWiki [...]

> The Free Encyclopedia of Print > Welcome to PrintWiki, the Free Encyclopedia of Print. PrintWiki strives to provide a comprehensive, open-source knowledge base of information on the printing and graphic communication industry. > >   > > A special note from PrintWiki > > January 2015 > > As of January 2015 the wiki is in a read-only static archive state. Maintai...

 

OxyContin Donuts [...]

> When they learned the doctor had a weakness for sweets, they came up with a new plan: deliver a box of with donuts and other treats carefully arranged to spell out the word "OxyContin." The surprise gift won over the doctor, who began prescribing OxyContin. "We are pleased that we have such a sweet start in developing a relationship with this 'no-see' physician," th...

 

French Course Evaluation Test [...]

Both French and American students are biased against female instructors, although the mechanisms are different. > The French students were, in effect, randomly assigned to either male or female section leaders in a wide range of required courses. In this case, the study authors found, male French students rated male instructors more highly across the board. Is it bi...

 

Woke Programmers [...]

When we automate the status quo, we are automating white supremacy, whether we are "woke" or not. > But the problem with predictive policing goes beyond Northpointe or biased algorithms. Focusing on the algorithms relies on a delimited analysis of how power works: If only we could have woke programmers, then we would have woke systems. Swap out “programmers” for ...

 

Red Pill Politics [...]

Red Pill politics, the belief that there is an all-encompassing secret reality that others are not privy to, dominates the alt-right. > One of the favorite memes of the so-called alt-right is the “red pill,” from the movie The Matrix. To swallow the red pill is to be liberated from the pleasing illusion that one lives in a thriving, happy country—and to awaken t...

 

Natural Rulers of the World [...]

The alt-right appeals to gamers because of the white male geek sense that they are the natural rulers of the world, held back by political correctness. > The affinity between gamers and right politics makes sense. "It’s not hard to see why this ideology would catch-on with white male geeks," Klint Finley writes in his excellent explainer on neoreaction. "It tells th...

 

Thirsty Facebook [...]

> There was something reassuring, even calming about staring down Facebook’s algorithmic firehose, mouth open. For all its billions of users, its towering piles of cash, its army of brilliant engineers, the company is still no stand-in for a human being — not even close. Sure, Facebook knew more about what I wanted than I’d given it credit for, but very little a...

 

Socrates in a Raincoat [...]

David Weinberger wrote one of his first articles on how Columbo was modeled after Socrates. > In 1974, the prestigious scholarly journal TV Guide published my original research that suggested that the inspector in Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment was modeled on Socrates. I’m still pretty sure that’s right, and an actual scholarly article came out a few year...

 

Policy Through Bridge Height [...]

Robert Caro discusses his shock at understanding how seemingly neutral infrastructure decisions were being used to enforce segregation. Here he discusses Robert Moses, a city planner who built racism into the city's architecture. The example: he built 180 or so bridges too low for buses to pass under, effectively keeping black users of public transport out of broad s...

 

Hubble Changed Open Data [...]

Before Hubble, telescope operators would often hold on to material until it had been analyzed. Hubble changed that culture....

 

Evaluation Bias From Women [...]

> The American case was a little bit different. Here, the authors performed a new analysis of a clever experiment published in 2014. Students were taking a single online class with either a male or female instructor. In half the cases, the instructors agreed to dress in virtual drag: The men used the women's names and vice versa. Here, it was the female students, no...

 

Why Companies Hold On To Toxic Data [...]

> If data is toxic, why do organizations save it? > > There are three reasons. The first is that we're in the middle of the hype cycle of big data. Companies and governments are still punch-drunk on data, and have believed the wildest of promises on how valuable that data is. The research showing that more data isn't necessarily better, and that there are serious dim...

 

Data As Toxic Asset [...]

> All this makes data a toxic asset, and it continues to be toxic as long as it sits in a company's computers and networks. The data is vulnerable, and the company is vulnerable. It's vulnerable to hackers and governments. It's vulnerable to employee error. And when there's a toxic data spill, millions of people can be affected. The 2015 Anthem Health data breach affe...

 

Greenwich Compliments [...]

> But for Facebook, anonymity is a big no-no. In May, the behemoth social networking platform locked the original Greenwich Compliments profile, preventing the founder from logging in, reviewing compliments, and tagging complimentees. Citing the company’s identity policies, a Facebook representative explained that in the great majority of cases, anonymous accounts s...

 

Co-Created Massively Collaborative Music [...]

> What Ferris has done is not a novel concept: Online crowdsourcing has been applied to thousands of projects over the past decade. Still, his experiment is unique in that he has made a piece of art — typically a highly personal, subjective, and individualistic pursuit — into a very public, collaborative process. > > "It’s hard to think that you could crowdsour...

 

Heliotropic Mechanisms [...]

The sunflower example is called "heliotropism." In other words, the light causes certain cells at the base of the plant to shrink, while those in the shadow size swell (one or both of those will happen), and the plant turns accordingly....

 

CardBox:: How Do Sunflowers Face the Sun? [...]

Fun with Flowers. [[Heliotropic Mechanisms]] [[Turgor Pressure, Extra Cells]] [[Light Inhibits Growth]]...

 

CardBox:: Suicide [...]

A box on issues of suicide, with a mostly American focus. [[Early Teen Suicide]] [[Wyoming's Suicide Problem Is More Than a White Male Problem]] [[Utah Suicide]] [[Country Music and Suicide]] [[Behind the Greenland Suicides]] [[Greenland Contagion]] [[Greenland Suicide Rate]] [[Suicides at 30-Year High in U.S.]] [[Marriage Rates and Suicide]] [[Opioids, Alcohol, Suici...

 

Barista Myth [...]

> At one point during the Great Recession, half of recent college graduates were underemployed. But contrary to popular perception, few occupied low-skill service positions, like that of the ubiquitous barista. In fact, fewer than 10 percent of recent graduates work in such jobs, according to a paper released this week by the National Bureau of Economic Research. > >...

 

Collective Effervescence [...]

> Collective effervescence is a term that calls to mind the bubbles in fizzy liquid. It’s a term from Émile Durkheim used to describe a particular force that knits social groups together. Collective effervescence explains why you still attend church even though the sermons are online, why you still attend sporting events even though they’re broadcast in much high...

 

Death of Visible White Supremacy [...]

> Anderson: I would push back on that a bit. What we’re seeing is the death of it operating so visibly. But when you look at the differentiation in wages, for instance, when you look at the differentiations in wealth, when you look at who took the hardest hit and rebounded the least after the Great Recession, whiteness carries incredible value in American society. B...

 

Not Soviet Cultural Collapse [...]

> One thing about the Soviet Union, as many people have drawn that comparison, is that the trend there was men only. In the United States, this is not men only. The Soviet Union was largely alcohol-fueled. Alcohol plays a part here, but opioids and heroin play a much larger part. Also, I think the Soviet Union was a lot to do with the fact that Mikhail Gorbachev had h...

 

Racism as Mute Button [...]

> Racism is perceived to be a “mute button” pressed on someone while they are still crying out about a sense of lost status—from a position of historic advantage, frequently in terms they have difficulty articulating. > > Therefore, the preface “I’m not racist” is not a disclaimer, but rather an exhortation to listen and not dismiss or invalidate the clai...

 

Quantified but not Effective [...]

> Wearable activity monitors can count your steps and track your movements, but they don’t, apparently, help you lose weight. In fact, you might lose more weight without them.The fascinating finding comes from a study published today in JAMA that found dieting adults who wore activity monitors for 18 months lost significantly fewer pounds over that time than those w...

 

South African Fees [...]

> South African universities will be allowed to increase their tuition fees by up to 8 per cent in 2017, but students from low- and middle-income families will not have to foot the bill. > The announcement triggered protests at campuses across the country, despite the government’s decision to provide support for the first time for students from the so-called “miss...

 

Suicide Clusters [...]

Suicides are not purely stochastic events one suicide can (and does) often influence others.  Influence can extend not only to probability but also method of execution. A recent example has occurred in Palo Alto, where a cluster  has taken the lives of four students in the Palo Alto Suicide School District. All four died by suicide along the Caltrain corridor. A p...

 

College Suicides Down Slightly [...]

Contrary to public perception, suicides at colleges may be down slightly. That's probably because Schwartz's account of what's going on is rather nuanced. While anecdotal accounts of ever-more-mentally-ill students abound, he said that “If you look at things that are a bit more carefully, rigorously tracked, like rates of suicide, actually, when rates of suicide wer...

 

Declining Young Adult Suicide Rates in the 1990s [...]

Suicide rates among young adults declined markedly in the late 1990s. While there are many explanations as to why this pattern emerged, much evidence points to the introduction of newer antidepressants and an increased awareness among medical practitioners of the issue. Others suggested that the fall might have been due to an improving economy. [caption id="attachment...

 

Suicide Rates Fall in Russia [...]

> New figures show that the number of suicides in Russia has dropped to its lowest level in 50 years. Such low levels were last seen at the end of Nikita Khrushchev's rule and in Leonid Brezhnev's first years in power...

 

Opioids, Alcohol, Suicide [...]

In contrast to every other major demographic, death rates for middle aged whites are rising, and rising fast. While part of this is attributable to increasing suicide rates, stunning new research indicates much of the increase is due to drug and alcohol abuse. The effect is centered in the poorest populations, and seems to be related to increased use of various legal ...

 

Marriage Rates and Suicide [...]

> Julie Phillips, a professor of sociology at Rutgers who has studied suicide among middle-aged Americans, said social changes could be raising the risks. Marriage rates have declined, particularly among less educated Americans, while divorce rates have risen, leading to increased social isolation, she said. She calculated that in 2005, unmarried middle-aged men were ...

 

Suicides at 30-Year High in U.S. [...]

> Suicide in the United States has surged to the highest levels in nearly 30 years, a federal data analysis has found, with increases in every age group except older adults. The rise was particularly steep for women. It was also substantial among middle-aged Americans, sending a signal of deep anguish from a group whose suicide rates had been stable or falling since t...

 

Greenland Suicide Rate [...]

> There was one problem: There were no clear answers to any of Anda's questions about why people were killing themselves or how to prevent it. Like native people all around the Arctic — and all over the world — Greenlanders were seeing the deadly effects of rapid modernization and unprecedented cultural interference. American Indians and Alaska Natives (many of wh...

 

Behind the Greenland Suicides [...]

> Her observations are in line with something psychologists and sociologists think is fundamental to the causes of suicide in Greenland. When communities are disrupted, like Kangeq was, families start to collapse. There's an increase in alcoholism, child neglect and physical abuse, all of which are risk factors for suicide. Later, people who didn't get the love and su...

 

Greenland Contagion [...]

> Sometimes, suicides can start chain reactions. Psychologists call it the contagion effect or suicidal transmission — after a close family member or friend kills himself, people who are already having suicidal thoughts are at greater risk for suicide. For that reason, suicide clusters or waves are especially likely in small, isolated communities where everyone know...