Wikity


You can read your cards by clicking the title on the card. If you are logged in, edit them by clicking the small dot after the title (full editor) or clicking on the text of the card (quick editor).

Additional options: Home, Wik-it!, Go to Hub, Log in

Search:

How Wikity Works [...]

Much of software development is _open_, meaning that anybody is allowed to take code that someone else has written and modify it for their own purposes. This is similar to the idea of open content in education: open textbooks, open educational resources, open pedagogy. When someone performs a modification of this type we celebrate it as a success, and call it a "fork...

 

Fake News Trends On Unmoderated Facebook [...]

Wow. > Earlier this year, Facebook denied criticisms that its Trending feature was surfacing news stories that were biased against conservatives. But in an abrupt reversal, the company fired all the human editors for Trending on Friday afternoon, replacing them with an algorithm that promotes stories based entirely on what Facebook users are talking about. Within 72 ...

 

Historical Roots of Predictive Policing [...]

> To begin to answer that question, one must trace the disparate histories of predictive policing’s component parts through a series of crises and conjunctions. Actuarial techniques like Northpointe’s (or the older Level of Service Inventory–Revised, another recidivism-risk-assessment battery) emerge out of insurance companies’ demand for risk management durin...

 

Woke Programmers [...]

> But the problem with predictive policing goes beyond Northpointe or biased algorithms. Focusing on the algorithms relies on a delimited analysis of how power works: If only we could have woke programmers, then we would have woke systems. Swap out “programmers” for “cops” and you have a version of the “few bad apples” theory of policing, which ignores the...

 

Data Anonymization and the Dot-town Suicides [...]

How much data anonymization is good enough? The problem is harder than you think Consider this classic puzzle, called _The Dot-Town Suicides_: > Each resident of Dot-town carries a red or blue dot on his (or her) forehead, but if he ever figures out what color it is he kills himself. Each day the residents gather; one day a stranger comes and tells them something—a...

 

Heizer’s City [...]

> “City” is a monumental architectonic work, with dimensions comparable to those of the National Mall, in Washington, D.C., and a layout informed by pre-Columbian ritual cities like Teotihuacan. Heizer started it in 1972, when he was in his late twenties and had already established himself as an instigator of the earthworks movement, a group of artists, including ...

 

Parfit’s Teleporter [...]

John Locke asserted that continuity of memory was what defined the me-ness of each of us, our sense of identity. A 1980's thought experiment by Derek Parfit puts an interesting twist on that and causes us to question whether this common-sense notion is sufficient. The first question imagines a simple teleporter: "Suppose that you enter a cubicle in which, when you pr...

 

Quantum Entanglement and Teleportation [...]

> For a long time, physicists assumed quantum teleportation wasn’t possible. In order to teleport an object, like our pig lizard, we must scan it to obtain precise information about its atomic structure. However, the more accurately an object is scanned, the more it is disturbed by the process of being scanned. We can’t measure a particle without altering it in so...

 

Not a Path But a Way of Life [...]

> So if you now number yourself among the disenchanted, then you have no choice but to accept things as they are, or to seriously seek something else. But beware of looking for goals: look for a way of life. Decide how you want to live and then see what you can do to make a living WITHIN that way of life. But you say, “I don’t know where to look; I don’t know wh...

 

Values Affirmation Is Powerful | Otium [...]

> I think of this quality as being a free person or being sovereign.  The psychological literature will often characterize it as “self-esteem”, but in popular language “self-esteem” is overloaded with “thinking you’re awesome”, which is different.  Everybody has strengths and weaknesses and nobody is wonderful in every way.  Being sovereign doe...

 

Neera Tanden’s Background [...]

> Tanden knows from normal. Unlike most of Clinton’s top people, she comes from a childhood of hardship and turmoil unusual in the rarified upper levels of Washington politics. When she was in elementary school, her father – who dabbled in real estate — sold the family home in a Boston suburb and skipped out without giving Tanden, her stunned mother and older br...

 

Linda Williams on Z-Degree [...]

> Here & Now's Meghna Chakrabarti finds out about the approach from Linda Williams, who teaches a zero-textbook business administration course at Tidewater Community College in Virginia....

 

Prevalence of Cheating Stable as Nature Shifts (1964-1997) [...]

Cheating was relatively stable as a student behavior between 1964 and 1997), but the type of cheating (from isolated incidents to collaborative efforts and from implicit to explicit) may have shifted. It's notable that this shift occurred before the impact of the internet. > Understanding student cheating is particularly important given trends that show cheating is w...

 

Cheating To Thrive or Survive [...]

> McCabe and Hanson agree that while students at all levels resort to cheating, it's those at the top and at the bottom who tend to cheat more. > > "The top's cheating to thrive, the bottom's cheating to survive," McCabe says, "and those in the middle are content with their grades and just go along in life and are happy."...

 

Students Less Likely To Cheat In Upper Level Classes [...]

Students are less likely to cheat in upper-level classes than in broad prerequisites. > It should come as no surprise that students are less likely to cheat in upper-level classes in their majors: These tend to be smaller, more personal, more focused on the students’ own interests, and in general far more intrinsically motivating to students. But we welcome student...

 

Encouraging Cheating [...]

Structure of education encourages cheating. > At most American universities, it’s traditional to begin the educational process with a type of class that sets up those motivations exactly wrong. Consider your typical introductory college lecture course. A student enters Major University and enrolls in History of Western Civilization. She is told this class is a requ...

 

Masculinizing Benefits [...]

> Trump, the King of Shame, has covertly come to the rescue. He has shamed virtually every line-cutting group in the Deep Story—women, people of color, the disabled, immigrants, refugees. But he's hardly uttered a single bad word about unemployment insurance, food stamps, or Medicaid, or what the tea party calls "big government handouts," for anyone—including blue...

 

Murray On the Big Split [...]

> But something else seemed at play. Many blue-collar white men now face the same grim economic fate long endured by blacks. With jobs lost to automation or offshored to China, they have less security, lower wages, reduced benefits, more erratic work, and fewer jobs with full-time hours than before. Having been recruited to cheer on the contraction of government benef...

 

Life As It Feels To Them [...]

> The most widespread of these suspicions, of course—shared by 66 percent of Trump supporters—is that Obama is Muslim. > > What the people I interviewed were drawn to was not necessarily the particulars of these theories. It was the deep story underlying them—an account of life as it feels to them. Some such account underlies all beliefs, right or left, I think...

 

Lessons of the Commune [...]

> The later, more successful communes, he said, were a result of lessons learned in the early movement: ''that there has to be some leadership and decision-making, some control of membership, that you can't sell drugs to people in town, go skinny-dipping in the town pond and offend your neighbors.'' > > Then, all these years later, Mr. Houriet's eyes filled with tear...

 

Pandora’s Box of the Liberated Self [...]

> Marty Jezer, a co-founder of Packer Corners, blamed the failure of the movement on the profound conflict within the counterculture. ''We had a big cider press operation at Packer Corners,'' Mr. Jezer recalled, ''and I remember being up on top of the press one day, feeding in apples to make cider. A bunch of hippies had come by to help, but instead they were dancing ...

 

Johnson Pastures Slum [...]

Johnson Pastures, one of the better known Vermont communes, became a "slum" as participation broadened. The first arrivals shared common philosophy and values, future buses that arrived did not. > ''The Red Clover Collective was the educated, affluent kids,'' Mr. Lieberman said. ''The people at the Free Farm were middle-class kids, emulating the Red Clover hippies, a...

 

Johnson Pastures Fire [...]

The fire at the Johnson Pastures Commune became a symbol of the excesses and issues of communes more generally, at least in Vermont. > The quest for a utopia soon turned into a self-destructive orgy of excess, many participants concluded, culminating symbolically in the fire that razed the big house at the Johnson's Pastures Commune, by far the largest of the commune...

 

Cozy Mystery [...]

> The cozy mystery (sometimes simply called a cozy) is a subgenre of crime fiction that gives readers a chance to delight in vicariously solving a murder—without graphic violence or sex. Protagonists are typically amateur (and usually female) sleuths solving small-town crimes with old-fashioned detective work rather than forensics. These unlikely heroes are often sm...

 

Gareth Keenan – Team leader [...]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZMqOMtl5C0 Martin Freeman Clips...

 

I Feel Like [...]

Short note: the "I feel like" hedge that is growing in popularity could be seen as a general trend towards making statements inarguable, or as one Cornell linguist put it, "relativism run amok". This is a small example of the (sometimes) false promise of bringing feelings into conversation. Ideally bringing feelings into a conversation should help us better communicat...

 

LANPAR [...]

A bit on LANPAR, predecessor to VisiCalc. > “LANPAR” – LANguage for Programming Arrays at Random is the world’s first electronic spreadsheet. > > Co-invented and developed by Rene Pardo and Remy Landau this software was created in 1969 and it’s use sold to the Plant Budgeting Divisions of Bell Canada, AT&T and the 18 Operating Telephone Companies across the...

 

WordPerfect Was a University Project [...]

WordPerfect, the application that truly launched the word-processing revolution, was a university project. > WordPerfect, the piece of software that turned word processing into big business, came to life much the same way Netscape did—it was based on work originally done at a university, Brigham Young University to be exact. (That's right, the Mormons brought us wo...

 

Structured Moderation, Gender, and Dialogue in a Small Meeting [...]

A note from a writer on a Wikipedia/Librarians meeting. Structured facilitation and discussion dominance. > It rewards the quick and assertive, whereas I spent today watching participation be more equal and distributed when there was structured moderation, and slide into literally 90% male voices in the last ten minutes of the day, when people were feeling punchy and ...

 

Rewarding Certainty Over Doubt [...]

Andromeda Yelton writes on the hidden bias of Wikipedia's editing process: > The encyclopedia that anyone can edit is the encyclopedia where everyone has the right to the floor. And there’s a liberation in that — on the internet, no one knows you’re a dog and the things you say matter — but there’s also an oppression, in that it rewards everyone who’s nev...

 

The Invention of Copy and Paste [...]

> The folks at Xerox PARC invented a lot of stuff in the 70s that would later become incredibly common in modern computers. One of those things was copy-and-paste, which Larry Tesler added to the Gypsy editor. The editor, one of the first "modeless" text editors, also supported the mouse. "Gypsy was the very first thing outsiders in the company understood," Tesler rec...

 

Electric Pencil [...]

> The 1975 creation of the Electric Pencil, the first commercially available word processor specifically written for a home computer, was so early to the game that the TRS-80 didn't support lowercase characters—which meant the manual for the software had to explain how to modify the hardware for the machine to support lower-case text. Jerry Pournelle, a science fict...

 

Paperwork Explosion [...]

IBM "Paperwork Explosion" commercial. Full of electronic MOOG-y goodness. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IZw2CoYztk > And when the company needed to promote the first typewriter that relied on reusable storage, the MT/ST (Magnetic Tape/Selectric Typewriter), it worked with a guy who at the time was best known for coffee commercials, and teamed him with another guy w...

 

IBM’s 8-Bar Logo [...]

> IBM’s best-known logo by Rand, was actually its second. Its first, a set of blocky slab-serif letters, eventually went the way of the dodo, but the company stuck with Paul Rand—who eventually gave the logo some new life with a few stripes. “Rand’s series of IBM logos culminated in a 1972 version formed from stacked stripes, suggesting speed and dynamism, ...

 

Obama on National Conversations [...]

Obama believes "national conversations" harden positions instead of softening them: > And then, finally, I think it’s going to be important for all of us to do some soul-searching. You know, there’s been talk about, Should we convene a conversation on race? I haven’t seen that be particularly productive when, you know, politicians try to organize conversations....

 

Failure of the Troll Model [...]

> Although Trump has been seemingly slow to realize it, the more than $2 billion in free media he rode to the GOP nomination was simultaneously hardening the broader country’s negative view of Trump just as it was endearing him to the conservative base. The cascade of Trump-created controversies following the conventions that precipitated Conway’s hiring appear to...

 

Purdue Pharma [...]

Much of the blame for the current opioid epidemic can be placed at the feet of Stamford, Connecticut company Purdue Pharma and the system which enabled it to thrive. A family-owned business, Purdue "struck gold" after getting FDA approval for Oxycontin, a new opioid formulation. They presented their formulation as a breakthrough, claiming it provided 12 hours of reli...

 

False Promise of Valium [...]

Valium was initially marketed as a non-addictive drug of which it was impossible to take a lethal overdose. > It was initially believed that Valium was not addictive and that it was nearly impossible to take a lethal dose by a suicidal person. After about ten years on the market, Valium had been prescribed to 59.3 million patients. Accounting for 81% of the tranquil...

 

Route to Heroin Abuse [...]

As documented elsewhere on wiki, the route to most current heroin abuse is not recreational use, but painkiller addiction: > According to statistics from the Center for Disease Control, drug use researchers like Kolodny, and even the DEA, what gets people addicted to heroin in places like New Hampshire and Vermont is the over-prescription or ready availability of pain...

 

Tsongas Would Have Died In Office [...]

> There’s a history of candidates concealing their medical risks. After former Massachusetts senator Paul Tsongas won the 1992 Democratic primary in New Hampshire, his personal doctors vouched for his health, implying that Tsongas’ cancer was cured when it was actually incurable. Tsongas would’ve died before his first term was over....

 

Purdue Pleads Guilty [...]

> The company that makes the narcotic painkiller OxyContin and three current and former executives pleaded guilty today in federal court here to criminal charges that they misled regulators, doctors and patients about the drug’s risk of addiction and its potential to be abused. > > To resolve criminal and civil charges related to the drug’s “misbranding,” the...

 

Twelve Hour Problem [...]

Purdue Pharma misrepresented the amount of time Oxy worked. This not only created nonexistent benefits of the drug over competitors, but created a harmful cycle of addiction. > The drugmaker Purdue Pharma launched OxyContin two decades ago with a bold marketing claim: One dose relieves pain for 12 hours, more than twice as long as generic medications. > > Patients wo...

 

Chemtrail Politics [...]

> He will almost certainly survive his August 30 primary to face Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick, a top Democratic recruit with a long record of winning tough races, in November. But he has had to endure a pesky primary battle against Kelli Ward, a little-known state senator who once held a public hearing on the conspiracy theory that the government has been deliberately poisoni...

 

I Miss You (Bjork Video) [...]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKSoBJ8WirE Interestingly, MTV got upset over Bjork's animated breasts in the final seconds of this video, and would only play it at night....

 

Teenage Björk [...]

Old video footage of Bjork. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAuP1JDesJs > BONUS: Exclaim noted that some footage of Björk’s pre-Sugarcubes teenage punk band, Tappi Tíkarrass, or, translated, “Cork the Bitch’s Ass,” had resurfaced this week. And though it seems like this footage has actually been online for quite a while (the YouTube video was posted in 2012...

 

Teenage Björk [...]

Old video footage of Bjork. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAuP1JDesJs > BONUS: Exclaim noted that some footage of Björk’s pre-Sugarcubes teenage punk band, Tappi Tíkarrass, or, translated, “Cork the Bitch’s Ass,” had resurfaced this week. And though it seems like this footage has actually been online for quite a while (the YouTube video was posted in 2012...

 

Teenage Björk [...]

Old video footage of Bjork. > BONUS: Exclaim noted that some footage of Björk’s pre-Sugarcubes teenage punk band, Tappi Tíkarrass, or, translated, “Cork the Bitch’s Ass,” had resurfaced this week. And though it seems like this footage has actually been online for quite a while (the YouTube video was posted in 2012), I personally feel that with around 100,00...

 

Jobs That Don’t Exist [...]

> Tomorrow’s university graduates will be taking a journey into the professional unknown guided by a single, mind-blowing statistic: 65% of today’s students will be doing jobs that don’t even exist yet. > > Technological change, economic turbulence and societal transformation are disrupting old career certainties and it is increasingly difficult to judge which ...

 

GritBit [...]

Stanford wants to instrument grit. > SCHMUTTE: Technology has tremendous potential to help students become more self-aware and intentional as learners. One of our concepts was something we called the Grit Bit — like a Fitbit, but for learning. Imagine a tool that tracks metrics related to students’ progress: stress and mood levels, physical activity, social activ...

 

Natural Rulers of the World [...]

The alt-right appeals to gamers because of the white male geek sense that they are the natural rulers of the world, held back by political correctness. > The affinity between gamers and right politics makes sense. "It’s not hard to see why this ideology would catch-on with white male geeks," Klint Finley writes in his excellent explainer on neoreaction. "It tells th...

 

Denominalization [...]

> This is called denominalisation, which is the technical term for converting a noun to a verb. There are two ways to accomplish this conversion. You can either affix the noun with a suffix, like -ify, as in purify or clarify. Or you can do what we’ve been doing, and just steal a thing and do it. The name for the second option is zero derivation – because nothing...

 

A bug that has been in the family for generations [...]

User nyh on a discussion board for a certain Mozilla Firefox bug that the first one to analyse the bug was his father, back in 2007. He is now working on solving it himself, and he ponders how his daughter might very soon face the bug herself. This points to the fact that code, no matter how ephemeral and ever-changing, can still be around for generations. It's also ...

 

AI’s White Guy Problem [...]

> But this hand-wringing is a distraction from the very real problems with artificial intelligence today, which may already be exacerbating inequality in the workplace, at home and in our legal and judicial systems. Sexism, racism and other forms of discrimination are being built into the machine-learning algorithms that underlie the technology behind many “intellig...

 

Philippine Meme Factory [...]

> Then, of course, there’s the content, which, at a few dozen posts a day, Nicoloff is far too busy to produce himself. “I have two people in the Philippines who post for me,” Nicoloff said, “a husband-and-wife combo.” From 9 a.m. Eastern time to midnight, the contractors scour the internet for viral political stories, many explicitly pro-Trump. If something...

 

Facebook’s Khan Conspiracy [...]

> Readers who clicked through to the story were led to an external website, called Make America Great Today, where they were presented with a brief write-up blended almost seamlessly into a solid wall of fleshy ads. Khan, the story said — between ads for “(1) Odd Trick to ‘Kill’ Herpes Virus for Good” and “22 Tank Tops That Aren’t Covering Anything” ...

 

Dressing Up The Email Blast [...]

Sanders followers repurposed frequent Sanders email blasts into graphic Faqcebook memes. > Rafael Rivero is an acquaintance of Provost’s who, with his twin brother, Omar, runs a page called Occupy Democrats, which passed three million followers in June. This accelerating growth is attributed by Rivero, and by nearly every left-leaning page operator I spoke with, n...

 

Identity Headlines [...]

> From a user’s point of view, every share, like or comment is both an act of speech and an accretive piece of a public identity. Maybe some people want to be identified among their networks as news junkies, news curators or as some sort of objective and well-informed reader. Many more people simply want to share specific beliefs, to tell people what they think or, ...

 

Too Short Tweet [...]

> Holy Moly! So more than half of all the people that huddled with Clinton were donors to her family’s foundation? Grab the can of damage-control spray! > > Or maybe not. Click through to the actual article and a key qualifier rears its head. The count doesn’t include anyone in the U.S. federal government or representatives of foreign governments. In other words...

 

Put That There (1980) [...]

> "Put That There" was a pioneering MIT effort studying more natural ways of communicating with computers through gesture, voice and collaboration. These sorts of interactions are commonplace now on home game consoles here you see the foundations being laid a full thirty years ago. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sC5Zg0fU2e8...

 

Animated Page Flips, 1977 [...]

The argument for simulating page-flips goes back a long way. > SDMS does not distinguish between icons and document windows, like Xerox Star will do a few years later. The user can zoom into the minimized thumbnail world of material until an item becomes clear and legible. The monitor to the right will display control elements to edit the document in focus. For examp...

 

Filebox As Playlist [...]

The Filebox in Xerox's NoteCards system was similar to the "playlists" of today. > In addition to the standard text and graphic cards, NoteCards has more card types built in. These are filebox and browser cards. They support the user in sorting and categorizing the content cards. A filebox is a simple way to collect cards that have some aspects in common. Fig. 2.6 sh...

 

Xerox NoteCards [...]

> NoteCards (cf. 2.1.6) is originally a research project at Xerox PARC starting in the early-1980s. It uses a physical card metaphor; i.e. each card displays its content in a separate window. The system is designed to support information-analysis tasks, like reading, interpretation, categorization and technical writing [Shneiderman/Kearsley 89]. For that reason the fo...

 

Disk Overwrite [...]

> ENQUIRE ultimately proved a failure - in terms of it being implemented within the research divisions of CERN - but it was vital for providing a conceptual basis for the future World Wide Web. It is believed that the original ENQUIRE program - that was stored on a diskette - was overwritten by either Brian Carpenter or Robert Cailliau during the mid 1980's....

 

HyperTIES Demo [...]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fZi4gUjaGAM...

 

Douglas Engelbert’s Augment and NLS [...]

> In 1962 Douglas Engelbert started to develop computer tools to augment the human intellect. The project was called Augment. In contrast to the Memex, Augment was actually implemented and was successfully demonstrated in 1968. Although it was not developed as a hypertext system, NLS (online system), a part of the Augment project, had many hypertext features like cros...

 

ENQUIRE [...]

> ENQUIRE was a software project written in 1980 by Tim Berners-Lee at CERN,[2] which was the predecessor to the World Wide Web.[2][3][4] It was a simple hypertext program[4] that had some of the same ideas as the Web and the Semantic Web but was different in several important ways. > > According to Berners-Lee, the name was inspired by a book entitled Enquire Within...

 

Focussed on the Printout [...]

Coombs: > The development of tools providing new capacities has been replaced by safe and obvious enhancements of comfortable procedures. Second, developers and authors have lost sight of the fact that there are two products in the electronic development of a document: the printout and the "source" file. Currently everything is directed toward producing the printout;...

 

Scholarly Text Processing and the Death of Innovation [...]

> Even in academia there is reduced impetus for more intelligent systems. Universities have their own business and administrative offices that make good use of business-oriented systems. Moreover, scholars often prefer these systems over the alternatives. Those who have access to more powerful systems rarely have the time to learn to exploit them fully, and many find ...

 

Engagement and Overconfidence [...]

Good presenters can lead to lousy learning, due to the overconfidence effect. > Eloquent and engaging scientific communicators in the mould of physicist Brian Cox make learning seem fun and easy. So much so that a new study says they risk breeding overconfidence. When a presenter is seen to handle complicated information effortlessly, students sense wrongly that they...

 

Social Media Rot [...]

> Social media content has grown exponentially in the recent years and the role of social media has evolved from just narrating life events to actually shaping them. In this paper we explore how many resources shared in social media are still available on the live web or in public web archives. By analyzing six different event-centric datasets of resources shared in s...

 

Kintsugi: “Golden repair” [...]

: A pottery repair technique in which some sort of gold is used in the repairing material so that the repair is made visible instead of invisible, acknowledging that a repair has been made. I thought about how this was the opposite of the way repairs are normally made as invisible as possible - but it dawned on me that in these times, repairs might not even be made. T...

 

It Just Hadn’t Read It [...]

> It’s a hard story for journalists to tell. Journalists are, despite their political reputation, fundamentally conservative. The only way to keep explaining what’s happening in the world, day after day, is to rely on some basic frames. Cause and effect have to unfold within stable institutions, according to accepted rules.A story that falls outside the everyday f...

 

Reverse Nationalism [...]

> The alt-right, the online mini-movement that backs Trump while hurling anti-Semitic imprecations at everyone who might doubt his greatness, is characterized by a reverse nationalism, in which sometimes Russia, sometimes Hungary, sometimes the Hohenzollern monarchy becomes the object of perverted patriotism. Their own mongrel country and its flaccid Constitution rece...

 

Red Pill Politics [...]

> One of the favorite memes of the so-called alt-right is the “red pill,” from the movie The Matrix. To swallow the red pill is to be liberated from the pleasing illusion that one lives in a thriving, happy country—and to awaken to the hideous truth that one is deceived and exploited, a captive in a ruined land. Trump ran the first red-pill presidential campaign...

 

Drop in NYC Reported Felonies [...]

An amazing stat. > From 1988 to 2008, the number of felonies reported by New York City to the FBI dropped from 719,887 to 198,419 – a remarkable 72 percent reduction. Outside of New York City, the number of crimes declined by half as much, only 38 percent....

 

New Jersey’s 1994 TiS Law [...]

New Jersey's 1994 Truth in Sentencing Law was milder than most, aiming at judicial transparency rather than mandatory minimums. (It would not have met the 1994 federal standard for TiS). > Under the measure, judges will be required to "inform the public of the actual period of time" that a defendant is likely to spend in prison as a result of the sentence. > > Judges...

 

Blocking Jenna [...]

Jenna's Law, which applied Truth-In-Sentencing provisions to first time violent felony offenders in New York was passed due to overwhelming public pressure. > Janice Grieshaber Geddes remembers how then-Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver would not let Jenna's Law come to a vote in 1998 even though the overwhelming majority of the Assembly's members supported it. > > Ged...

 

Truth In Sentencing, New York 1995 [...]

> In 1995, the Governor ended indeterminate sentencing for second-time violent felony offenders and provided that if an offender maintains a good disciplinary and program record while in prison, he or she would be eligible for release only after serving 85 percent of his or her prison term. Jenna's Law applied this more broadly to first time violent felony offenders...

 

Delaware’s 1990 Truth in Sentencing Act [...]

Indeterminate sentencing was replaced in Delaware by the Truth in Sentencing Act of 1990, which ushered in determinate sentencing. > In Delaware, for offenders convicted up to 1990, a parole release date can be established after a minimum of one-third of the sentence has been served. In addition to a one-third term parole date, time served is further reduced by a com...

 

Original Rushmore Design [...]

Sometimes we have to stop projects a bit early. But that's OK. Here's the original Mount Rushmore design....

 

Two Months More [...]

> Though recent sentencing reforms are linked to increasing time served, the average (or mean) sentence length imposed on offenders entering prison decreased, from 72 months in 1990 to 68 months in 1996 (table 5). Consistent with sentencing policy change, the projected minimum time expected to be served by persons entering prison increased slightly. If parole eligibil...

 

Indeterminate Sentencing [...]

Indeterminate sentencing was the norm in the U. S. penal system through the 1970s. Under indeterminate sentencing, prisoners could be released at any point by parole boards, and the sentence handed down in court was meant only as a maximum. Indeterminate sentencing put the focus of imprisonment on rehabilitation, but also resulted in vastly unequal sentences for simil...

 

End of Discretionary Release by 1999 [...]

Fourteen states had abolished early release by discretion of a parole board for all offenders by January 1999. Notably absent here are California and New York. State Year Maine 1975 Indiana 1977 Illinois 1978 Minnesota 1980 Florida 1983 Washington 1984 Oregon 1989 Delaware 1990 Kansas 1993 North Carolina 1994 Arizona 1994 Mississippi 1995 Ohio 1996 Wi...

 

Fact Plus Spin [...]

> if Breitbart’s success is from publishing articles that it knows will upset its readers, the key is to publish the stories that present the perfect combination of facts to fuel rightwing anger. For example, a story about homeland security secretary Jeh Johnson, who visited Louisiana following the recent floods, saying Obama could not also attend because he has ...

 

Natural Inequality [...]

riddled with similar endowments. Researchers have found associations between physical performance and more than 200 genetic variations. More than 20 of those relate to elite athleticism. These performance-enhancing variations can affect height, blood flow, metabolic efficiency, muscle mass, muscle fibres, bone structure, pain threshold, fatigue resistance, power, spe...

 

Sexism Patrol [...]

>For some reason, there's been a remarkable online effort to paint the Rio Olympics as a bottomless pit of sexist drivel. The evidence in favor of this is thin to the point of nonexistence, and today it reached comical proportions. Here is Emily Crockett at Vox: >It’s no wonder that this unfortunate Olympics headline, from the Colorado paper the Greeley Tribune, cau...

 

True Impact of Federal Three Strikes [...]

The federal three strikes law has become over time the most controversial aspect of the 1994 Crime Bill among Democrats. But what was the actual impact? What we can find in terms of data indicates that the impact of that provision was small at best. First, to get the major question out of the way: habitual offender laws (as distinct from three strikes laws), enacted o...

 

The Game Of Hating People [...]

> Which are exactly the kinds of messages Em Ford, 27, was receiving en masse last year on her YouTube tutorials on how to cover pimples with makeup. Men claimed to be furious about her physical “trickery,” forcing her to block hundreds of users each week. This year, Ford made a documentary for the BBC called Troll Hunters in which she interviewed online abusers a...

 

Robbers Cave [...]

As I put in The Better Angels of Our Nature, alluding to the famous Seinfeld monologue about team sports, "People root for clothing instead of blood and soil." Psychological experiments going back to the famous 1950s Robbers Cave study show that hostilities can be tamped down when both sides have to work for a superordinate goal, such as pulling a bus out of the mud....

 

Aesthetic of Powerlessness [...]

Via Jesse Baron/Sianne Ngai, cuteness is an aesthetic of powerlessness, which may be used to defuse our deep suspicion of technology which is too powerful. > In her essay “The Cuteness of the Avant-Garde,” Sianne Ngai, a professor at Stanford, theorizes cuteness as an “aesthetic of powerlessness.” In the face of the overwhelming question — “What’s it ...

 

Coding/making tutorial in ASL [...]

This from 2014 features Jim Roberts giving a fairly typical Raspberry Pi tutorial - but it features ASL translation, which I have never seen before in a tutorial. I have never considered that ASL might be preferred in videos due to its visual nature - but it seems obvious when I think about it. Most tutorials I've seen features a voice over - both, I guess, because t...

 

Hostile Architecture [...]

A term for a set of practices that are hostile to common uses for public spaces. It's considered a form of "unpleasant design". > "The term hostile architecture is new—or new in the popular vernacular anyway," says James Petty, a freelance criminologist whose PhD research focuses on the ways in which society regulates homelessness. "But practices of designing citi...

 

Redemptive Technologies [...]

From Ursula Franklin's The Real World of Technology: >... the development and use of redemptive technologies ought to be part of the shaping of a new social contract appropriate for the real world of technology, one that overcomes the present disenfranchisement of people....

 

Path:: Recently Added [...]

[[Gain]] [[Death and Dishonor]] [[Technology as Practice]] [[The Gell-Mann Amnesia Effect]] [[Redemptive Technologies]] [[The Luddite Problem]] [[Drone Feminism]] [[Technological Imperialism]] [["Broken Windows" Policing]] [[Papert on Teaching Computer Skills]] [[Test Two: "Quotes" in the Title]] [[Attention Accounts]] [[Five Biggest Reading Mistakes]] [[Frozen Norms ...

 

Gain [...]

> "You have to look at the broader perspective," Clinton said. "He’s won some, and I’ve won some, but I have 2 and a [[half million more]] votes than he does. And I have a very significant lead in delegates." (Separately, Clinton’s campaign manager Robby Mook made the same claim in an April 4 Medium post titled, "To Hillary Clinton supporters: The facts on wher...

 

Death and Dishonor [...]

The Romans and many other cultures have often embraced a notion of honorable suicide. An honorable suicide is a suicide that is not done for personal reasons, but to achieve some greater good. Mark Antony's death, for example, was seen as dishonorable not because it was a suicide, but because he killed himself over a love affair. Cato the Younger, who killed himself a...

 

Analytics of Empathy [...]

Can data science be used to encourage better user behavior? A number of experiments with League of Legends show perhaps it can: But Beck and Merrill decided that simply banning toxic players wasn’t an acceptable solution for their game. Riot Games began experimenting with more constructive modes of player management through a formal player behavior initiative that a...

 

Alphabet Autonomy [...]

> Page himself explained in his blog post that one big reason for the change was to empower the division heads, now CEOs. “Alphabet is about businesses prospering through strong leaders and independence,” he wrote. This seemed quite a switch — when Page himself became Google CEO in 2011, he took steps to make the leaders (known as the L-team) work together, ...