Wikity


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How Wikity Works [...]

Much of software development is _open_, meaning that anybody is allowed to take code that someone else has written and modify it for their own purposes. This is similar to the idea of open content in education: open textbooks, open educational resources, open pedagogy. When someone performs a modification of this type we celebrate it as a success, and call it a "fork...

 

“Over-imitation” in Humans [...]

A strange finding children, unlike apes, tend towards replication of all actions when copying action sequences, even when those actions are obviously irrelevant to the outcome. An example of an irrelevant action might be tapping the side of a jar from which you will extract a prize with a stick. Here's an example of the behavior in a small child: https://www.youtube....

 

Over-imitation as Norm-Learning [...]

> These verbal measures do not support the hypothesis that children over-imitate primarily because they encode unnecessary actions as causing the goal even in causally transparent systems. In a causally transparent system, explanations for over-imitation fitting the results are that children are ignorant of the unnecessary action's purpose, and that they learn a presc...

 

Lifeboat Socialism [...]

> The final distinguishing characteristic of these left-wing survivor politicians, who have been thrust into leadership, is that they tend towards an individualistic, lone-wolf approach to politics. Bernie Sanders has spent decades as the only party-independent member of congress (despite caucusing with Democrats). Corbyn was content to tend his London district until ...

 

Negro Motorist’s Green Book [...]

>> While automobiles made it much easier for black Americans to be independently mobile, the difficulties they faced in traveling were such that, as Lester B. Granger of the National Urban League puts it, "so far as travel is concerned, Negroes are America's last pioneers."[13] Black travelers often had to carry buckets or portable toilets in the trunks of their cars ...

 

Trends [...]

> I work pretty hard to avoid knowing much about trends, other than how to buck them. I mean, it’s become far too rare that a trend is “Read more Latin American literature.” It’s more usually, “Buy adult coloring books” or “Buy 50 Shades of Grey” or “Buy 50 Shades of Grey adult coloring books”—in other words, the kind of bottom-line corporate dr...

 

Improving Fluid Intelligence [...]

Can [[fluid intelligence]] be improved? And under what circumstances? > Here, we present evidence for transfer from training on a demanding working memory task to measures of Gf. This transfer results even though the trained task is entirely different from the intelligence test itself. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the extent of gain in intelligence critically de...

 

Fluid Intelligence [...]

Fluid intelligence is generally seen as one of the most important inputs into professional and educational success. > Fluid intelligence (Gf) refers to the ability to reason and to solve new problems independently of previously acquired knowledge. Gf is critical for a wide variety of cognitive tasks, and it is considered one of the most important factors in learning. ...

 

Dawes Rolls [...]

> Those rolls were compiled by the U.S. government from 1893 to 1914 to enumerate Cherokee, Choctaw, Creek, Chickasaw, Oklahoma Seminole, and some Florida Seminole. Nobody has found a Warren ancestor on the Dawes Rolls. That doesn’t mean there isn’t one there. > > More than a quarter-million people applied to be included when the Dawes Commission began its work....

 

Our Selfish Desires [...]

> Following modern traditions of zoo design, Harambe’s enclosure was separated from the public by a metal and wire fence of just three feet, though that sat atop a more severe 15-foot ledge. According to a 2015 video released by the Cincinnati Zoo, Harambe’s home was “the world’s first barless outdoor gorilla exhibit” when it opened in 1978. While it now see...

 

Degree Assortivity [...]

> Let me give you an example. This is very visual and, given this format, I'm not supposed to use visuals, but I'm going to cheat and use one slide in a moment. Let's say you had 1,000 people, and, on average, they each have five connections, so you have 5,000 ties between them. Mathematically, you could construct a number of ways in which you could organize these net...

 

A Social Science of Connections [...]

> So, the question I'm asking myself lately is: What would a social science of connections, rather than a social science of individuals, look like? What would it mean to take connections as the focus of inquiry and to think about the individuals as the spaces between the connections who are not so important? And then we begin to think about all the dyadic interactions...

 

Cellular Communalism [...]

> MIT researchers have found that cells in a bacterial colony grow in a way that benefits the community as a whole. That is, while an individual cell may divide in the presence of plentiful resources to benefit itself, when a cell is a member of a larger colony, it may choose instead to grow in a more cooperative fashion, increasing an entire colony’s chance of surv...

 

Eight Points of Reference for Commoning [...]

Elinor Ostrum identifies some necessities for a commons to truly work. You need spaces for conflict resolution, clear identification of who maintains what, and a method of punishing violations. > Commons do not exist in a perfect world, but rather in one that is hostile to commons. Therefore it is important that commoners be aware of the treasure they hold in their h...

 

Retweeted Corrections [...]

> Bartosz Milewski said “Guilty as charged!”. Wow. Much Respect. But notice that, as of this update, The correction has been retweeted 1/25th as often as the original tweet. People want to believe there’s evidence their position is superior. People don’t want to believe the evidence is murky, or even possibly against them. Misinformation people want to believe...

 

Hedonic Treadmill [...]

From NYT: > The evidence comes from an influential paper in 1978 reporting that lottery winners were not any happier than their neighbors or more optimistic about the future. In fact, they weren’t any more optimistic about their future happiness than a group of people who had been in accidents that left them paralyzed. > > It was one of the first studies testing t...

 

Myth of Hedonic Adaptation [...]

> The same thing applies to positive events. While it’s “common knowledge” that winning the lottery doesn’t make people happier, it turns out that isn’t true, either. > > In both cases, early cross-sectional results indicated that it’s plausible that extreme events, like winning the lottery or becoming disabled, don’t have long term effects on happiness...

 

Dunning-Kruger Reality [...]

> In two of the four cases, there’s an obvious positive correlation between perceived skill and actual skill, which is the opposite of the pop-sci conception of Dunning-Kruger. A plausible explanation of why perceived skill is compressed, especially at the low end, is that few people want to rate themselves as below average or as the absolute best. In the other two ...

 

Chatbot Lawyer [...]

> An artificial-intelligence lawyer chatbot has successfully contested 160,000 parking tickets across London and New York for free, showing that chatbots can actually be useful. > > Dubbed as “the world’s first robot lawyer” by its 19-year-old creator, London-born second-year Stanford University student Joshua Browder, DoNotPay helps users contest parking ticke...

 

From Know to Feel [...]

An interesting dynamic that also played out in the primary election with Clinton. > But that was the whole point. I did not wish that my book were Eat, Pray, Love. As the only journalist to live undercover in North Korea, I had risked imprisonment to tell a story of international importance by the only means possible. By casting my book as personal rather than profes...

 

Country Music and Suicide [...]

> This article assesses the link between country music and metropolitan suicide rates. Country music is hypothesized to nurture a suicidal mood through its concerns with problems common in the suicidal population, such as marital discord, alcohol abuse, and alienation from work. The results of a multiple regression analysis of 49 metropolitan areas show that the great...

 

Globalization Requires a Domestic Agenda [...]

> The view expressed by Chang and others I talked to represents nothing less than a Copernican shift. Dani Rodrik, a professor of political economy at Harvard, says, "The conversation in the last ten years has really turned from saying, 'The effect of globalization on insecurity and inequality is rather minimal and therefore you need the least amount [of social safety...

 

Summers on Welfare State [...]

> And, if free-trade advocates have given lip service to the idea of strengthening the welfare state in order to offset uncertainty and inequality, they've spent little political capital doing so. Which is why it is interesting to see that Lawrence Summers, who served as President Clinton's treasury secretary during the headiest days of free-trade enthusiasm, is now h...

 

Ikea Recall [...]

> The company said it had also received reports of at least 41 cases of Malm chests and dressers tipping over, resulting in a total of six deaths and 17 injuries to children. In addition, it received 41 complaints about other models of chests and drawers that also claimed the lives of three children and injured 19 others. > One of those, in July 1989, involved a 20-m...

 

Risks Digest [...]

> There are obviously a lot of good books about shipping software and managing the inherent risks: Everyone knows The Mythical Man Month, or Code Complete. But one great resource that doesn’t get enough press is The Risks Digest, an online news summary of software and technology risks that goes back to August 1985. Risks is a catalog of failure and problems with sof...

 

Looking for Helium [...]

> Helium doesn’t just make your voice squeaky – it is critical to many things we take for granted, including MRI scanners in medicine, welding, industrial leak detection and nuclear energy.  However, known reserves are quickly running out. Until now helium has never been found intentionally – being accidentally discovered in small quantities during oil and gas ...

 

The Soul of Japan and Fascism [...]

> It may come as an even greater surprise that bushido once received more recognition abroad than in Japan. In 1900 writer Inazo Nitobe's published Bushido: The Soul of Japan in English, for the Western audience. Nitobe subverted fact for an idealized imagining of Japan's culture and past, infusing Japan's samurai class with Christian values in hopes of shaping Wester...

 

Google’s Single Repository [...]

> This article outlines the scale of that codebase and details Google's custom-built monolithic source repository and the reasons the model was chosen. Google uses a homegrown version-control system to host one large codebase visible to, and used by, most of the software developers in the company. This centralized system is the foundation of many of Google's developer...

 

Heart of the Sulk [...]

> At the heart of a sulk lies a confusing mixture of intense anger and an equally intense desire not to communicate what one is angry about. The sulker both desperately needs the other person to understand and yet remains utterly committed to doing nothing to help them do so. The very need to explain forms the kernel of the insult: if the partner requires an explanati...

 

Red Team Switch [...]

> In 2013, Van Bavel told me of a trick that sounded so simple and hopeful. Sometimes he’ll switch a red-team participant to the blue team and vice versa. "We say, 'Listen, there's been a mistake, you're actually on the other team,' " he told me then. "And the moment we do, we completely reverse their empathy. Suddenly they care about everybody who is in their new i...

 

Write Your Own Name In Every Time [...]

If real world impacts of elections don't matter, why vote for a third-party candidate at all? Why not just write in your own name? > In his interview, Nader goes on to defend his idiosyncratic belief that people are under no obligation to consider real-world impacts in their voting behavior. Vote for a third-party candidate, write in a candidate, follow your own consc...

 

Nader Impact [...]

Everyone but Nader voters and Nader know that he was, more than any single individual, responsible for the election of George W. Bush. > The facts of Nader’s impact are fairly clear. His candidacy helped Bush in three ways. First, by insisting Bush and Al Gore were ideological twins, “Tweedledee and Tweedledum,” he aided Bush, who was trying to mute the ideologi...

 

Gaiman on Net Culture [...]

> What I tend to see happening more and more is people retreating into their own corners. People seem scared to get things wrong or be shouted at so they form villages in which they agree with every other member, and maybe they go out and shout at the people in the next village for fun, but there’s no interchange of ideas going on. I think we have to encourage the i...

 

Presidents.json [...]

[ { "OP": 1, "Brookings" : 2, "President": "George Washington", "Elected First": 1, "Date of birth": "February 22, 1732", "Date of inauguration": "April 30, 1789", "Age at inauguration": "57 years, 67 days", "End date of presidency": "March 4, 1797", "Age at retirement": "65 years, 10 days", "Length of retirement": "1,015 days...

 

Keeping Complexity in the Frame [...]

Frame 394 follows a young man from Toronto who entangles himself in one of America’s most high-profile police-involved shootings. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GZSb00oSzuY...

 

Department of Agriculture ERS Chart of the Day [...]

Research office of USDA produces/curates an interesting chart of the day. It's awesome....

 

Foreign Accent Syndrome [...]

> Fewer than 100 people worldwide have been diagnosed with foreign accent syndrome over the last century, according to experts at Houston Methodist Sugar Land Hospital. > > Foreign accent syndrome is most often caused by brain damage from a stroke or traumatic brain injury, but it's also been linked to multiple sclerosis and other health issues. In some cases, no cle...

 

Homophily [...]

> Similarity breeds connection. This principle—the homophily principle—structures network ties of every type, including marriage, friendship, work, advice, support, information transfer, exchange, comembership, and other types of relationship. The result is that people's personal networks are homogeneous with regard to many sociodemographic, behavioral, and intrap...

 

Rivals Monotheism [...]

> Still, Heffernan believes that we are living through a revolution. “The Internet is the great masterpiece of civilization,” she says. “As an idea it rivals monotheism.” And: “If it’s ever fair to say that anything has ‘changed everything,’ it’s fair to say so about the Internet.” Analog is dead. To understand the new regime, she argues, we need a...

 

Reviews Are J-Shaped [...]

> Reviews tend to be asymmetrically bimodal; they form a J-shaped distribution, with many high ratings, a smaller number of low ratings, and not much in between. The higher number of high ratings may reflect “positivity bias.” Studies show that if the first review is a rave subsequent reviews are more likely to be positive. If you are selling a product online, it ...

 

Taste Is Like Traffic [...]

> Vanderbilt is intrepid; he is also fair. He desperately wants to find a non-circular account of preferences, something better than “People like this kind of thing because this is the kind of thing that they—or people around them, or people who are supposed to know—like,” but he has to admit defeat. There is no place outside the swirling galaxy of taste forma...

 

The Outlier Is Essential to the Type [...]

> Understanding how traffic works is made exponentially more complicated by the fact that it’s not just one person who is barely paying attention; all the drivers on the road are barely paying attention, and they’re also reacting to each other. The same is true of taste. The reason stuff you don’t like is out there is that other people do like it. The continuous...

 

Seventeen Seconds [...]

> Maybe “toasted” trumped “foraged.” Likes and dislikes can be triggered by random associations and can form in a split second. We make choices before we’ve had time to weigh the options. Vanderbilt tells us that the median amount of time spent looking at a work of art at the Met is seventeen seconds. Shopping for clothes, we say, “Oh, I love that!” befo...

 

iOS Game Model [...]

> To give some idea of just how awful iOS was for us, the first non-iOS game I did after spending two years on iOS, released on a Sony handheld that many describe as being “obscure”, generated literally *thousands* of times more income for us than two years and ten games on iOS with its potential billions of users. In the face of that I would have been absolutely ...

 

IQ Expectations [...]

> The conclusion is that brain-training games don't really do anything to increase intelligence and that brain-training research should be rigorous. But that sure seems like it's burying the lead. If this research is reliable, it tells us that a mere expectation of brain training will increase your IQ by a whopping five points. And I don't mean "whopping" in a sarcast...

 

Ad Share of GDP [...]

> Advertising and Attention > > Despite all of the upheaval caused by the Internet, there are two truths about advertising that have remained constant: > > Advertising’s share of GDP has remained consistent for 100 years > > TV’s share of advertising, after growing for 40 years, has also remained consistent at just over 40% for the last 20 years > > T...

 

Is Inifinity Real? [...]

> Euclidean geometry has a way of turning mathematically inclined students into lifelong math lovers, and I was no exception. But a primitive assumption has always troubled me: The definition of a “geometric point” refers to something that has position, but no dimensions, so there can be an infinite number of them in any given line segment. While you can imagine s...

 

Minimum Viable Organism [...]

> Peel away the layers of a house — the plastered walls, the slate roof, the hardwood floors — and you’re left with a frame, the skeletal form that makes up the core of any structure. Can we do the same with life? Can scientists pare down the layers of complexity to reveal the essence of life, the foundation on which biology is built? > > Audio Player > > ...

 

Emotional Control [...]

> In contrast, being exposed to the reform was associated with lower emotional control. To interpret the possible differential impact on emotional control in children from different socioeconomic backgrounds, one must consider that the reform had different implications for different social groups. The reform’s impact on years of education suggests that a majority of...

 

Blackfeet Bison Famine [...]

> I think back to an interview I had a few years ago with Woody Kipp, a journalist, teacher, and member of Montana’s Blackfeet tribe. Generations ago, the average Blackfeet man ate 3 to 7 pounds of bison a day, supplemented with chokecherries, turnips, and wild berries. “There was no want, no hunger,” Kipp said. “We didn’t grow any grains. No grains.” But ...

 

Differential Preservation [...]

> The differential preservation of perishable versus nonperishable materials in the archaeological record means that many Stone Age societies appear, on the basis of artifacts alone, to have greatly emphasized stone technologies at the expense of perishable technologies. Such differential preservation conveniently informed and reinforced mid-20th-century “Man the Hu...

 

Deviant Globalization [...]

> The underworld operates openly in Carteland, but its covert networks reach everywhere illegal commodities are bought and sold. These transactions connect underworld producers to upper-world consumers in a complex transnational economy that has recently undergone tremendous expansion. The historian Nils Gilman has called this process “deviant globalization,” mean...

 

Rothstein’s Gambit [...]

> This is a problem because thieves like to rob other thieves. Arnold Rothstein, a famous bootlegger in the 1920s, allegedly made a fortune when he sold his entire fleet of rum-running ships to rival gangsters and then repeatedly hijacked their cargoes of contraband liquor. In other words, he successfully offloaded the maintenance and overhead expenses of his shipping...

 

Social Class of Kiss [...]

> To go by today’s popular Western culture you would think the romantic kiss is a pleasurable human universal. Many people, including evolutionary and social psychologists, have suggested as much. It seems a natural conclusion: Even chimpanzees and bonobos kiss—including with open mouths and tongues. But clearly not everyone kisses. In fact, in our recent study, p...

 

Context Collapse [...]

> The ethnographer danah boyd (who spells her name with lowercase letters), one of the earliest researchers of social lives online, refers to “social convergence” in social networking sites. Social convergence, she argues, occurs when multiple social worlds merge. This results in “context collapse,” meaning social media sites bring together different social co...

 

Aggregating Deviation Doesn’t Work [...]

> Even Isaac Newton seems not to have appreciated this. While he was Warden of the London Mint, coins were weighed in batches to assess them for consistency: the weight deviation permitted per coin was multiplied by the quantity in the lot. As a result, quality control was an order of magnitude looser than intended. A shrewder (and less scrupulous) warden could have m...

 

Lance Armstrong Conspiracy Test [...]

> Is this conceivable? In 50 years! You, an intelligent Quoranian, know that it’s not. Consider Lance Armstrong. One man with a small team. Could he keep his doping secret? > > Yet the MLDs would have you believe that not one of NASAs thousands blabbed for big bucks in all this time. C’mon! It just isn’t credible, is it?...

 

Great Library at Alexandria Died Through Budget Cuts [...]

> All of these violent events left their wear and tear on the library, and no doubt diminished its collections — as well as its reputation as a center of scholarship. But as library historian Heather Phillips notes in an essay on the library at Alexandria, the destruction was gradual — and it had more to do with government spending cuts than it did with a great fi...

 

Predicting vs. Expressing [...]

> In the tight 2004 campaign, the polls that asked Americans which candidate they supported — all the way up to the exit polls — told a confusing story about whether President George W. Bush or Senator John Kerry would win. > > But another kind of polling question, which received far less attention, produced a clearer result: Regardless of whom they supported, wh...

 

Education and Shortcuts [...]

> Surveys conducted in the weeks before showed that many people didn’t understand what the alternative system was or what would change were it adopted. Yet many voted anyway, led by their perceptions of party leaders – whether they thought them competent or likeable, for example. > This is the kind of cognitive shortcut that psychologists have found we all use in ...

 

Podcasting Education [...]

> The secret to why podcast audiences are growing and attracting new voices might be authenticity. In addition to being more diverse, podcast hosts are better at sounding like themselves. Even tightly edited podcasts like “Serial” and Gimlet Media’s “ Startup” allow people to speak spontaneously and conversationally. Some voices aired are slow and others ...

 

A Perfect Gun Control Match [...]

> Watts only had 75 friends on her personal Facebook page, but she remembers watching the likes on this new page go from the hundreds to the thousands to the tens of thousands. "It was amazing," she says. Eventually a million wasn't big enough, and Watts changed the name to "Moms Demand Action." > > As the group grew, Watts caught the notice of Michael Bloomberg. The...

 

Not So True Grit [...]

Grit believers believe that a combination of perseverance and consistency work together as "grit" a teachable orientation towards the world that can predict success. But consistency is turning out to not be predictive, and perseverance looks suspiciously like "conscientiousness" from the Big Five Traits in psychology, and conscientiousness is not malleable (that's why...

 

Brain Training Bunk [...]

> In a study designed to assess the experimental methods of earlier brain-training studies, researchers found that sampling bias and the placebo effect explained the positive results seen in the past. “Indeed, to our knowledge, the rigor of double-blind randomized clinical trials is nonexistent in this research area,” the authors report. They even suggest that the...

 

How to Drive with a Backup Camera [...]

> So how should you drive with a backup camera? Ironically, you need to change your driving habits back to what they were before you got a backup camera. That is, you should treat it as simply another window. Don't obsess over it. Crane your neck and check all your windows and your rearview mirror and your backup camera. In other words, drive just like you used to exc...

 

TiVo and Ad Blockers [...]

> I'd like to make fun of this, but it's actually decent advice. The current hysteria over ad blockers reminds me of the hysteria over TiVo when it first arrived in 1999—which itself was just an updated version of the hysteria over VCRs back in the 80s. If people can record shows, they'll skip the ads! We're doomed! > > But no. TV ad revenue has been surprisingly s...

 

Bodies Go Meh [...]

> In 2011, Ellard led small groups on carefully planned Lower East Side walks to measure the effect of the urban environment on their bodies and minds. Participants recorded their response to questions at each stopping point and wore sensors that measured skin conductance, an electrodermal response to emotional excitement. Passing the monolithic Whole Foods, people’...

 

Mosquitoes Like High Metabolic Rates [...]

> Unfortunately, a big part of the reason some people get more mosquito bites than others comes down to genetics. > > "One reason, we know, is that people vary greatly in their metabolic rates — and the higher the metabolic rate, the more carbon dioxide you're releasing," Day says. "People also naturally vary in the amount of the secondary attractants they release...

 

SAT Benchmark [...]

> A few numbers help clarify the nature and scope of the problem. The College Board has suggested a “college readiness benchmark” that works out to roughly 500 on each portion of the SAT as a score below which students are not likely to achieve at least a B-minus average at “a four-year college”—presumably an average one. (By comparison, at Ohio State Univer...

 

The Rise of the Meritocracy [...]

> The Rise of the Meritocracy is a satirical essay by British sociologist and politician Michael Young which was first published in 1958. It describes as dystopian society in a future United Kingdom in which intelligence and merit have become the central tenet of society, replacing previous divisions of social class and creating a society stratified between a merited ...

 

Late! [...]

> This app, called "late!" tracks the total number of minutes that your friends have kept you waiting. It also sends texts to your friends who are late for an event. "Kristi is a bad friend."...

 

The Problem of “Code as Contract” [...]

This is amazing. Under the "smart contracts" of the recently hacked DAO (a blockchain-based investment project), the "code" is seen as the contract between users and the site what the code allows is what is legal. What we usual think of as the contract what the user agrees to is just a description of what the code allows. But taken to its logical conclusion this me...

 

JPMorgan and the Limits of the Law [...]

> One more story, one of my all-time favorites. The California electric grid operator built a set of rules for generating, distributing and paying for electricity. Those rules were dumb and bad. If you read them carefully and greedily, you could get paid silly amounts of money for generating electricity, not because the electricity was worth that much but because you...

 

Median Voter Theorem [...]

In general, elections in a "first past the post" system will tend to favor centrist positions. > The median voter theorem states that "a majority rule voting system will select the outcome most preferred by the median voter".[1] > > The median voter theorem makes two key assumptions. First, the theorem assumes that voters can place all election alternatives along a ...

 

IPR In China [...]

China's intellectual property law is dealt with by a two track system of local and national authorities. > Civil enforcement of IPR in China is a two-track system. The first is the administrative track, whereby an IPR holder enlists the aid of a local government agency office (see Chinese Agencies Involved in IPR Enforcement). The second is the judicial track, whereb...

 

Comment Hacking Lonelygirl15 [...]

If you replied to comments on YouTube in the early days, your replies counted towards getting you on the most commented list. > Behind the scenes, Beckett was obsessing over how YouTube worked. How did a video get on the most viewed section? How did it climb the charts? When they realised YouTube counted every single comment including the ones you made yourself, they...

 

Brown Mackie Closing [...]

For-profit weakness in the medical assisting market. > "We're seeing a lot of consistent nursing market strength and that's the one bright spot in the vocational school market, but the market for medical assisting, which is what Brown Mackie does, has been really weak," Urdan said. > Brown Mackie's overall enrollment has been falling; it has dropped to 7,773, Greenlee...

 

Toxic Fandom [...]

"Shipping" the process of fans writing abut imagined pairings of characters and actors has been around for a long while. But in an age of Twitter, where stars can be accessed directly, things are going wrong. > The idea that the mere practice of shipping crosses a line is not typical; traditionally, fans have clung to an actual imaginary line between fandom and crea...

 

Inevitability of LonelyGirl15 [...]

LonelyGirl15 creators threw up the project quickly partially because they knew a project like this was inevitable, and they wanted to be the first. > The first couple of videos they put up didn’t feature Bree at all – they were video replies to some of the site’s biggest stars, designed to take advantage of the close-knit community feel YouTube had at the time....

 

Joke Cocoon [...]

Cocoon of familiarity is a phrase I've heard in a number of contexts, this is one. > Most jokes are novelty within a cocoon of familiarity @NewYorker cartoon Editor Bob Mankoff, speaking at @SPXcomics #SPX2014...

 

Hacking the Freeze Frame [...]

Early online video project LonelyGirl15 figured out to hack the YouTube freeze frame so they could get the best cover photo for the episode. > They also mathematically figured out at what point in the video YouTube’s algorithm would scrape the preview image. Flinders said it made a huge difference. “If it was a good freeze frame, you would get like 100,000 more v...

 

Searching for Open Materials (Lib as Lead) [...]

> One of the top functions of people who support open education is finding OER. There are a lot of ways to search for open materials, and there are a lot of repositories that house open materials. I believe that experience searching repositories is very important, but it is just as important to remember that the best searches for OER start with smart reference intervi...

 

Asteroid 2016 HO3 [...]

> A small asteroid has been discovered in an orbit around the sun that keeps it as a constant companion of Earth, and it will remain so for centuries to come. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SbbAnVU4rmY...

 

Your brain is not a computer [...]

So much of the language used to describe learning (by ed tech companies, OLI, etc) implies or explicitly states that learning involves processing, storing, and retrieving information at appropriate times and that learners can improve their "knowledge states" through various kinds of activities (e.g., goal-directed practice). This examines how the brain-and subsequent...

 

IL-22 [...]

Parasites can sometimes have benenficial effects. A protein called interleukin-22 may be behind some of them. > Loke agreed to monitor Vik, a decision that would alter the course of his own research. Over the following four years, Vik relapsed twice. Whenever his whipworms grew old, the colitis flared. Then he drank more eggs, and his disease came back under control....

 

Our/Their [...]

Our blessed homeland, their barbarous waste....

 

Women Exiting Engineering Due to Role Assignments [...]

> It’s been easy to blame women leaving the engineering workforce to balance the demands of family, but is that really it? Many have said there’s a culture problem, but what exactly does that mean? > > It turns out, according to a recent study, that at least a big part of it happens when women are in mixed groups that need to divide chores. Typically, the divisio...

 

Wedge Issues [...]

> As The New Republic's Brian Beutler notes, "wedge issues" have a long and storied history. Richard Nixon, for example, famously used crime in 1968 to split black voters and blue-collar whites, two key Democratic voting blocs. George W. Bush used issues like terrorism and gay marriage in 2004 to put Democrats on the defensive with conservative swing voters. In the ne...

 

Human Scale Technology [...]

To me, the idea of human scale is critical. It’s easy to fall into the trap of thinking that every idea must scale. That thinking is distracting, closes us off from great opportunities, and invites unnecessary complexity.   Turn down the amplifier a little bit. Stay small. Allow for human correction and adjustment. Build for your community, not the whole wo...

 

Clinton Wins High Gini States [...]

> Earlier this year, we noticed a pattern in which states were voting for Hillary Clinton and which were voting for Bernie Sanders in the Democratic nominating contests. Sanders tended to win the states that had the highest income equality (as measured by the Gini index, a widely used measure of inequality), and Clinton tended to win states that were the most unequal....

 

Culture of the Provisional [...]

> “I heard a bishop say some months ago that he met a boy that had finished his university studies, and said ‘I want to become a priest, but only for 10 years.’ It’s the culture of the provisional. And this happens everywhere, also in priestly life, in religious life,” he said. > > “It’s provisional, and because of this the great majority of our sacrame...

 

Silicon Valley’s Blank Slate [...]

> In short, Ford and Ziade argue, tech companies spend their first several years either creating a wholly new space in the world (like social media did) or “dropping an atomic bomb” on another industry, as Ziade puts it (like Uber and Airbnb have been). Once companies have triumphed, tech titans resent entering into other spheres of power (like politics or the m...

 

Punched in the Mouth [...]

> Of all the famous quotations Mike Tyson has spawned over the past quarter century, my favorite is this: > > "Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth." > > In advance of the former heavyweight champion's appearance Saturday night at the Seminole Coconut Creek Casino, where he will perform his one-man stage show, "Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth," I as...

 

Discretionary Monitoring [...]

> Yikes! For officers who kept the cameras rolling all the time, use-of-force fell 37 percent. That's not just huge, it's positively gargantuan. Use-of-force only increased among officers who turned their cameras on and off. In other words, the real headline result is: keep the cameras rolling all the time and use-of-force plummets. So why on earth does the headline s...

 

Narcissistic Rage [...]

> Kohut explored a wide range of rage experiences in his seminal article 'Thoughts on Narcissism and Narcissistic Rage' (1972).[17] He considered narcissistic rage as one major form among many, contrasting it especially with mature aggression.[18] Because the very structure of the self itself is weakened in the narcissist, their rage cannot flower into real assertiven...

 

Stereotype Threat and Police Exams [...]

From an interview on the World Economic Forum site (which is surprisingly good). A description of how a small change to an invitation email increased pass rates on police recruitment exam for the London police force: >Small, contextual factors can have impacts on people’s performance. In this particular case, there is literature to suggest that exams for particular ...

 

Tax Nudge [...]

An example of how norming via nudges can change action. > One of our biggest early wins was about looking at a group of people who hadn’t paid their taxes on time. We thought, is there some way we could nudge them into paying their tax and paying off what they owe to government? We tested a bunch of different types of interventions, largely around how you talk to t...

 

Gating Item [...]

Gating items are all or nothing performance test items. They are not usually the only item on the test, but the test is structured in such a way that if the test-taker cannot adequately execute the gating item, they will fail. Some gating items are natural results of authentic assessment. Some are contrived. The gating nature can be intentional or unintentional, good ...

 

High Participation Systems Increase Inequality [...]

Higher education systems that have high participation rates (e.g. 50%) may exacerbate inequality more than ones that have low participation rates (15%). New research is cited. > Academics may be proud to be part of this massive expansion in access to learning. But according to new research by an expert on international higher education, the advent of “high-particip...

 

120 Years of Electronic Music [...]

> 120 Years of Electronic Music* is a project that outlines and analyses the history and development of electronic musical instruments from around 1880 onwards. This project defines ‘Electronic Musical Instrument’ as an instruments that generate sounds from a purely electronic source rather than electro-mechanically or electro-acoustically (However the boundaries ...

 

Horizontal Comparison [...]

Related to choral explanations horizontal comparison allows better decisions in hiring at less cognitive load. Applicants answer a series of questions, and the questions are then looked at in turn rather than the individual applicants presentations. Because the questions can be read horizontally it prevents some of the bis one gets reading an application from top to...